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Proletarian Democracy

Proletarian Democracy
Democrazia Proletaria
General Secretary Mario Capanna
Founded 1975 (as coalition)
13 April 1978 (as party)
Dissolved 9 June 1991
Split from Italian Communist Party
Merged into Communist Refoundation Party
Newspaper Quotidiano dei lavoratori
Membership max: 10,310 (1988)
min: 2,500 (1979)
Ideology Communism[1]
Trotskyism[2]
Eco-socialism[3]
Pacifism[4]
Political position Far-left
International affiliation None
Colours      Red
Website
www.democraziaproletaria.it
Politics of Italy
Political parties
Elections

Proletarian Democracy (Democrazia Proletaria, DP) was a political party in Italy.

Contents

  • History 1
    • 1970s 1.1
    • 1980s 1.2
    • 1990s 1.3
  • Election results 2
    • Italian Parliament 2.1
    • European Parliament 2.2
  • References 3

History

1970s

DP was founded in 1975 as a joint electoral front of the

DP took part in the 1976 elections, winning 556,022 votes (1.51%) and 6 seats in the election to the Chamber of Deputies. On April 13, 1978, DP was transformed into a political party. The move to make DP into a real political party was pushed through by the minority wing of PdUP, led by journalist Vittorio Foa and Silvano Miniati; the majority of AO, led by Massimo Gorla and Luigi Vinci; and the League of the Communists, led by Romano Luporini.

The main figure of DP was the charismatic Mario Capanna, a former student leader associated with the 1968 new left movement.

The strongholds of DP were the industrial cities of Northern Italy, which had strong leftist traditions. DP was opposed to the so-called 'historic compromise' between the Italian Communist Party and the Christian Democrats.

During the 1978 electoral campaign, Peppino Impastato, a leading DP militant from Sicily, was murdered by the mafia.

In the 1979 elections for the European Parliament, DP won 1 seat.

1980s

In the Italian general election, 1983 DP won 542,039 votes (1.47%) and 7 seats in the election to the Chamber of Deputies. In the Italian general election, 1987 DP won 642,161 votes (1.66%) and 8 seats in the election to the Chamber of Deputies. In the same year DP won 493,667 votes (1.52%) and one seat in the election to the Senate.

In 1987 Capanna stepped down, and Giovanni Russo Spena became the secretary of DP. Two years later, the DP suffered a split, as a section led by Capanna launched their own list on ahead of the elections to the European Parliament, called Rainbow Greens.

1990s

On June 9, 1991 the congress of DP in Riccione decided to merge the party into the Communist Refoundation Movement, which became the Communist Refoundation Party.

Election results

Italian Parliament

Chamber of Deputies
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1976 557,025 (#7) 1.5
6 / 630
Mario Capanna
1979 did not run
0 / 630
Mario Capanna
1983 542,039 (#9) 1.5
7 / 630
Increase 7
Mario Capanna
1987 641,901 (#11) 1.7
8 / 630
Increase 1
Mario Capanna
Senate of the Republic
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1976 78,170 (#11) 0.3
0 / 315
Mario Capanna
1979 did not run
0 / 315
Mario Capanna
1983 327,750 (#10) 1.1
0 / 315
Mario Capanna
1987 493,667 (#11) 1.5
1 / 315
Increase 1
Mario Capanna

European Parliament

European Parliament
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1979 252,342 (#10) 0.7
1 / 81
Mario Capanna
1984 506,753 (#8) 1.4
1 / 81
Mario Capanna
1989 449,639 (#10) 1.3
1 / 81
Mario Capanna

References

  1. ^ http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/democrazia-proletaria_%28Dizionario-di-Storia%29/
  2. ^ Gli ultimi Mohicani. Una storia di Democrazia Proletaria, Matteo Pucciarelli, 2011
  3. ^ http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/democrazia-proletaria_%28Dizionario-di-Storia%29/
  4. ^ http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/democrazia-proletaria_%28Dizionario-di-Storia%29/
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