World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Pubis (bone)

Article Id: WHEBN0003963126
Reproduction Date:

Title: Pubis (bone)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Ischium, Ilium (bone), Dinosaur, Obturator foramen, Pelvis
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Pubis (bone)

Pubic of pelvis
Pelvic girdle
Male pelvis
Details
Latin Os pubis
Identifiers
MeSH A02.835.232.611.781
Anatomical terms of bone

In vertebrates, the pubic bone is the ventral and anterior of the three principal bones composing either half of the pelvis.

Contents

  • Structure 1
  • Function 2
  • In animals 3
    • Dinosaurs 3.1
  • Additional images 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Structure

It is covered by a layer of fat, which is covered by the mons pubis.

It is divisible into a body, a superior ramus and an inferior ramus.

In the female, the pubic bone is anterior to the urethral sponge.

The left and right hip bones join at the pubic symphysis.

The pubis is the lower limit of the suprapubic region.

Function

The body forms one-fifth of the acetabulum, contributing by its external surface both to the lunate surface and the acetabular fossa. Its internal surface enters into the formation of the wall of the lesser pelvis and gives origin to a portion of the obturator internus.

In animals

Dinosaurs

The clade Dinosauria is divided into the Saurischia and Ornithischia based on hip structure, including importantly that of the pubis.[1] An "opisthopubic" pelvis is a condition where the pubic bone extends back towards the tail of the animal, a trait that is also present in birds.[2] In a "propubic" pelvis, however, the pubic bone extends forward towards the head of the animal, as can be seen in the Saurischian pelvic structure pictured below. The acetabulum, which can be thought of as a "hip-socket", is an opening on each side of the pelvic girdle formed where the ischium, ilium, and pubis all meet, and into which the head of the femur inserts. The orientation and position of the acetabulum is one of the main morphological traits that caused dinosaurs to walk in an upright posture with their legs directly underneath their bodies.[3] The prepubic process is an bony extension of the pubis that extends forward from the hip socket and toward the front of the animal. This adaptation is thought to have played a role in supporting the abdominal muscles.

Additional images

See also


References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

  1. ^ Seeley, H.G. (1888). "On the classification of the fossil animals commonly named Dinosauria." Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 43: 165-171.
  2. ^ Barsbold, R., (1979) Opisthopubic pelvis in the carnivorous dinosaurs. Nature. 279, 792-793
  3. ^ Martin, A.J. (2006). Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs. Second Edition. Oxford, Blackwell Publishing. pg. 299-300. ISBN 1–4051–3413–5.

External links

  • Anatomy photo:44:st-0713 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "The Male Pelvis: Hip Bone"
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.