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Queensland state election, 1980

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Title: Queensland state election, 1980  
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Queensland state election, 1980

Queensland state election, 1980

29 November 1980 (1980-11-29)

All 82 seats in the Legislative Assembly of Queensland
  First party Second party
 
Leader Joh Bjelke-Petersen Ed Casey
Party National/Liberal coalition Labor
Leader since 8 August 1968 28 November 1978 (1978-11-28)
Leader's seat Barambah Mackay
Last election 59 seats 27 seats
Seats won 57 seats 25 seats
Seat change 2 2
Percentage 54.86% 41.49%
Swing 2.49 1.34

Premier before election

Joh Bjelke-Petersen
National/Liberal coalition

Elected Premier

Joh Bjelke-Petersen
National/Liberal coalition

Elections were held in the Australian state of Queensland on 29 November 1980 to elect the 82 members of the state's Legislative Assembly.

The election resulted in a fifth consecutive victory for the National-Liberal Coalition under Joh Bjelke-Petersen. It was the ninth victory of the National Party in Queensland since it first came to office in 1957.

Contents

  • Result 1
  • Key dates 2
  • Results 3
  • Seats changing hands 4
  • Post-election pendulum 5
  • References 6

Result

The election saw little change from the 1977 election. The Coalition Government was returned to office, although Labor gained two seats off the Liberals. The Liberal decline continued, and tensions between the Coalition parties increased.

Key dates

Date Event
27 October 1980 The Parliament was dissolved.[1]
27 October 1980 Writs were issued by the Governor to proceed with an election.[2]
7 November 1980 Close of nominations.
29 November 1980 Polling day, between the hours of 8am and 6pm.
23 December 1980 The Bjelke-Petersen Ministry was reconstituted.
10 January 1981 The writ was returned and the results formally declared.
3 March 1981 Parliament resumed for business.[3]

Results

Queensland state election, 29 November 1980[4][5]
Legislative Assembly
<< 19771983 >>

Enrolled voters 1,341,365
Votes cast 1,192,893 Turnout 88.93% –2.42%
Informal votes 18,008 Informal 1.51% –0.02%
Summary of votes by party
Party Primary votes % Swing Seats Change
  Labor 487,493 41.49% –1.34% 25 + 2
  National 328,262 27.94% +0.79% 35 ± 0
  Liberal 316,272 26.92% +1.70% 22 – 2
  Democrats 16,222 1.38% –0.23% 0 ± 0
  Progress 4,384 0.37% –1.13% 0 ± 0
  Independent 20,880 1.78% +0.09% 0 ± 0
  Others 1,372 0.12% +0.12% 0 ± 0
Total 1,174,885     82  

Seats changing hands

Seat Pre-1980 Swing Post-1980
Party Member Margin Margin Member Party
Lockyer   Liberal Tony Bourke 22.5 -28.8 6.3 Tony FitzGerald National  
Mourilyan   National Vicky Kippin 0.3 -1.6 1.3 Bill Eaton Labor  
Southport   Liberal Peter White 9.8 -11.9 2.1 Doug Jennings National  
Surfers Paradise   Liberal Bruce Bishop 5.7 -13.6 7.9 Rob Borbidge National  
Townsville West   National Max Hooper 0.9 -5.3 4.4 Geoff Smith Labor  

Post-election pendulum

References

  1. ^ "A Proclamation".  
  2. ^  
  3. ^  
  4. ^ Australian Government and Politics Database. "Parliament of Queensland, Assembly election, 29 November 1980". Retrieved 22 February 2009. 
  5. ^ Hughes, Colin A. (1986). A handbook of Australian government and politics, 1975-1984. ANU Press. p. 205.  
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