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Race riots

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Race riots

This is a list of ethnic/sectarian/race riots by country.

Angola

Australia

Belgium

Brazil

Bulgaria

Burma

Canada

  • Toronto (August 2–5, 1918)[4] - Anti-Greek Riot.
  • Toronto (August 16, 1933) - Christie Pits riot
  • Vancouver (September 7, 1907) - anti-Asian riot

China

Denmark

  • St. Croix riot (1873) - St. Croix
  • Jewish skirmishes (1820–22) - Various Danish and German cities and towns.

France

  • 2005 civil unrest in France – mainly Paris, but also in other high-immigrant areas.
  • Perpignan (2005) – Perpignan Riots[6] between Maghrebi and Roma communities after a man of Maghrebi descent was shot dead.
  • Avignon (September 2009) – between Turkish and Moroccan youths (one young of African descent was dead)

Indonesia

Israel

  • Tel Aviv (2012) - Race riots by Jewish Israelis against black African immigrants took place in May 2012 after the rape of an elderly woman, and an under age Israeli girl by Sudanese men in front of her boyfriend. [12][13][14][15]

Italy

Côte d’Ivoire

  • Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire (2004) - Anti-white riots[18][19]

Lesotho

Malaysia

Mauritania

Netherlands

New Zealand

  • Wellington (1943) - Battle of Manners Street was a conflict involving American servicemen versus New Zealand servicemen and civilians outside the Allied Services Club in Manners Street.

Pakistan

  • Sectarian violence in Pakistan

Poland

  • Przytyk pogrom (1936) - anti-Jewish riots in Przytyk, on March 9, 1936
  • Kraków pogrom (1945) - anti-Jewish riots that occurred on August 11, 1945, in the city of Kraków
  • Kielce pogrom (1946) - an outbreak of violence against the Jewish community of Kielce, Poland on July 4, 1946
  • Mława pogrom (1991) - a series of violent incidents in June 1991, when a crowd attacked Roma residents of the Polish town of Mława

Rhodesia

  • Kananga (1925) - Kananga Riot of 1925

Russia


Singapore

Solomon Islands

South Africa

  • Durban (1949) - Anti-Indian riots, an inter-racial conflict between Zulus and Indians in Durban.[25]
  • Durban (1985) - Anti-Indian riots[26]
  • Port Elizabeth, South Africa (2007) - Anti-Somali riot[27]

Soviet Union

Spain

Sri Lanka

Tanzania

  • Zanzibar (1964) - The Zanzibar Revolution of January 12, 1964 put an end to the local Arab dynasty. Thousands of Arabs were massacred in riots, and thousands more were detained or fled the island[32][33]

Tonga

Turkey

  • Eastern Thrace - 1934 Thrace pogroms, anti-Jewish pogrom.
  • Istanbul (1955) - Istanbul Riots, also known as Istanbul Pogrom.
  • Altınova (2008) - Kurdish-owned homes and shops were attacked and Kurds stoned.[35]

United Kingdom

United States

Nativist Period 1700s-1860

  • 1824: Providence, Rhode Island Hard Scrabble Riots
  • 1829: Cincinnati riots of 1829 Rioting against African Americans results in over a thousand leaving for Canada.
  • 1829: Charlestown Anti-Catholic Riots
  • 1831: Providence, Rhode Island
  • 1834: Massachusetts Convent Burning
  • 1834: Philadelphia pro-slavery riots[37]
  • 1835: Five Points Riot
  • 1835: Washington, D.C.[38][39]
  • 1836: Cincinnati riots of 1836. Several anti-abolitionist riots took place
  • 1841: Cincinnati, Ohio White Irish-descendant and Irish immigrant dock workers rioted against Black dock workers. When the Black dock workers banded together to defend their community from the approaching Whites, the White rioters retreated and then commandeered a 6-pound cannon and shot it through the streets of Cincinnati.
  • 1844: Philadelphia Nativist Riots (May 6–8/July 5–8)
  • 1851: Hoboken Anti-German Riot
  • 1855: Louisville Anti-German Riots

Civil War Period 1861-1865

Reconstruction Period: 1865 - 1877

Jim Crow Period: 1878 - 1914

War and Inter-War Period: 1914 - 1945

Postwar era: 1946 - 1954

  • 1946: Columbia, Tennessee Riot
  • 1949: Peekskill Riots
  • 1951: Cicero Race Riot in Illinois

Civil Rights and Black Power Movement's Period: 1955 - 1977

  • 1980: Miami Riots (Miami, Florida)
  • 1980: Chattanooga Riot (Chattanooga, Tennessee)
  • 1984: Lawrence, Massachusetts Race Riot: A small scale riot centered at the intersection of Haverhill and railroad streets between working class whites and Hispanics; several buildings were destroyed by Molotov cocktails; August 8, 1984.[53]
  • 1989: Overtown Riot (Miami, FL) In a reaction to the shooting of a black motorcyclist by a Hispanic police officer in the predominately black community of Overtown in Miami, residents rioted for two nights. The officer was later found guilty of manslaughter.
  • 1991: Crown Heights riot (Crown Heights neighborhood, Brooklyn, New York City)
  • 1992: Los Angeles Riots (Los Angeles, California): In a reaction to the acquittal of all four LAPD officers involved in the videotaped beating of Rodney King and the murder of Latasha Harlins; riots broke out mainly involving black youths in the black neighborhoods and shop owners in Korean neighborhoods, but overall rioting was mainly to get out the frustrations of the racial groups over the racial tensions that were building in the South Central neighborhood for years.
  • 1996: St. Petersburg Riots (St. Petersburg, Florida): After Officer Jim Knight stopped 18 yr. old Tyron Lewis for speeding, his car lurched forward and Knight fired his weapon, fatally wounding the black teenager. Riots broke out and lasted for about 2 days.
  • 2001: Cincinnati riots (Cincinnati, Ohio): In a reaction to the acquittal of Steven Roach after the fatal shooting of an unarmed young black male, Timothy Thomas, during a foot pursuit, riots broke out over the span of a few days.
  • 2003: Benton Harbor riots (Benton Harbor, Michigan)
  • 2005: 2005 Toledo Riot (Toledo, Ohio): A race riot that broke out after the Neo-Nazi protest marched through a black neighborhood.
  • 2006: Fontana High School riot (Fontana, California): Riot involving about 500 Latino and black students[54]
  • 2006: Prison Race Riots (California): A war between Latino and black prison gangs set off a series of riots across California[55][56]
  • 2008: Locke High School riot[57] (Los Angeles, California)
  • 2009: 2009 Oakland Riots (Oakland, California): Peaceful protests turned into rioting after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man, Oscar Grant, by a BART transit policeman.

See also

Revolution '67 - Documentary about the Newark, New Jersey race riots of 1967

External links

  • Revolution '67 Film website - Documentary about the Newark, New Jersey race riots of 1967

References

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