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Rainwater Basin

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Title: Rainwater Basin  
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Subject: Nebraska, Wildcat Hills, National Wildlife Refuges in Nebraska, Smoky Hills, Crime in Nebraska
Collection: Landforms of Franklin County, Nebraska, Landforms of Gosper County, Nebraska, Landforms of Hall County, Nebraska, Landforms of Hamilton County, Nebraska, Landforms of Kearney County, Nebraska, Landforms of Phelps County, Nebraska, Landforms of Saline County, Nebraska, Landforms of Seward County, Nebraska, National Wildlife Refuges in Nebraska, Protected Areas of Adams County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Clay County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Fillmore County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Franklin County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Gosper County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Hall County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Hamilton County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Kearney County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Phelps County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Saline County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of Seward County, Nebraska, Protected Areas of York County, Nebraska, Regions of Nebraska, Wetlands of Nebraska
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Rainwater Basin

Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District
IUCN category IV (habitat/species management area)
Map showing the location of Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District
Location Nebraska, USA
Nearest city Kearney, NE
Coordinates
Area 22,864 acres (92.52 km2)
Established 1963
Governing body U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Rainwater Basin is a 4,200 mi.2 (10,900 km2) region of shallow lakes, marshes and other wetlands located south of the Platte River in south-central Nebraska. In the spring and fall months, millions of migratory birds pass through the region to feed and rest. The Rainwater Basin, along with the Platte River, is a major component of the Central Flyway of North America. These oval basins occur south of the Platte River on the loess-covered landscape of Nebraska.

This area is often referred to as "God's Country" by residents.

The Rainwater basins are the surface expression of elliptical depressions developed in fluvial sands and gravels buried by a blanket of several meter-thick loess. These basins are palimpsest landforms created by the draping of a younger loess blanket over these underlying depressions (Zanner and Kuzila 2001). The loess, which overlies these features, contains an intact sequence, from bottom to top, of Middle Wisconsinan Gilman Canyon Formation, Late Wisconsin Peoria Loess, Brady Soil, Holocene Bignell loess resting upon a Late Illinoian Sangamon Soil developed in the fluvial sand and gravels in which these depressions have developed[1] The intact layering of these different loesses and associated paleosols, which are each called “soil” by Zanner et al. (2007), prove that the loess has not been disturbed since it started accumulating over 27,000 years ago. Thus, these buried elliptical depressions are over 27,000 years old[2]

Contents

  • Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District 1
  • Birds of the Rainwater Basin 2
  • Conservation 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District

The Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District (WMD) currently manages 61 tracts of land, 59 of which are Waterfowl Production Areas (WPA) totaling 22,864 acres (92,52 km2) in the U.S. state of Nebraska. One of the remaining two areas is McMurtrey Wildlife Management Area that was transferred from the U.S. Military and is closed to public use. The other tract is the Platte River National Wildlife Management Area and this property is owned by the state of Wyoming and managed through a memorandum of understanding. WPAs are small isolated tracts of land scattered throughout the District. The Wetland Management District is managed from offices in Kearney, Nebraska. All of the federally managed land was acquired from willing landowners and purchased with the proceeds of duck stamps that are sold to hunters each year.

Birds of the Rainwater Basin

The Rainwater Basin is a prime location for birdwatching; 257 bird species have been observed in the region.[2] Species in the Rainwater Basin include:

Conservation

Before the large-scale settlement of Nebraska in the late 19th century, there were 4,000 individual wetlands, covering 100,000 acres (400 km2), in the region. Since that time, about 90% have those wetlands have disappeared, with many being drained so that the land could be used for agricultural purposes. Many of the remaining sites have been set aside by government agencies and non-profit organizations; today, there are 84 publicly owned Rainwater Basin sites, totaling 28,600 acres (116 km2).

References

  1. ^ Zanner, C. W., and M. S. Kuzila, 2001, Nebraska’s Carolina bays. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 33, no. 6, pp. 438.
  2. ^ Zanner, C. W., W. Dort, Jr., and S. R. Bozarth, 2007, Holocene Bognell Loess Chronology. Stratigraphy and paleoenvironemntal reconstructions from within a loess table, Southwestern, Nebraska. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 39, no. 3, pp. 73.

External links

  • "Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District". U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Retrieved 2006-08-16. 
  • "Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District Annual Narrative Report" (PDF). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2004. Archived from the original (pdf) on 2006-07-24. Retrieved 2006-08-16. 
  • "Spring Migration Guide Nebraska's Rainwater Basin". Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. Retrieved 2006-08-16. 
  • "Rainwater Basin". The Nature Conservancy. Retrieved 2006-08-16. 
  • "The Rainwater Basin". Rainwater Basin Joint Venture. Retrieved 2006-08-16. 
  • Last of the Rainwater Basins Documentary produced by Nebraska Educational Telecommunications
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