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Richard Onslow, 1st Baron Onslow

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Title: Richard Onslow, 1st Baron Onslow  
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Subject: List of Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, Robert Walpole, Arthur Onslow, John Anstis, William Catesby
Collection: 1654 Births, 1717 Deaths, Alumni of St Edmund Hall, Oxford, Barons in the Peerage of Great Britain, British Mps 1707–08, British Mps 1708–10, British Mps 1710–13, British Mps 1713–15, British Mps 1715–22, Chancellors of the Exchequer of Great Britain, English Mps 1679, English Mps 1680–81, English Mps 1681, English Mps 1685–87, English Mps 1689–90, English Mps 1690–95, English Mps 1695–98, English Mps 1698–1700, English Mps 1701, English Mps 1701–02, English Mps 1702–05, English Mps 1705–07, Lord-Lieutenants of Surrey, Lords of the Admiralty, Members of the Inner Temple, Members of the Parliament of Great Britain for English Constituencies, Members of the Privy Council of Great Britain, People from Surrey, Speakers of the House of Commons of Great Britain, Whig (British Political Party) Mps
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Richard Onslow, 1st Baron Onslow

The Right Honourable
The Lord Onslow
PC
Speaker of the British House of Commons
In office
1708–1710
Preceded by John Smith
Succeeded by William Bromley
Chancellor of the Exchequer
In office
13 October 1714 – 12 October 1715
Preceded by William Wyndham
Succeeded by Robert Walpole
Lord Commissioner of the Admiralty
In office
5 June 1690 – 15 April 1693
Lord Lieutenant of Surrey
In office
1716–1717
Preceded by John Campbell
Succeeded by Thomas Onslow
Personal details
Born (1654-06-23)23 June 1654
Surrey, England
Died 5 December 1717(1717-12-05) (aged 63)
Great Britain
Political party British Whig Party

Richard Onslow, 1st Baron Onslow PC (23 June 1654 – 5 December 1717) was a British Whig Member of Parliament, known as Sir Richard Onslow, 2nd Baronet from 1688 until 1716. He served as the Speaker of the House of Commons from 1708 until 1710 and as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1714 until 1715. Onslow was a very unpopular figure amongst members of both political parties, particularly during his time as Speaker. He was extremely pedantic and showed an absolute devotion to principle, as a result he was given the nickname "Stiff Dick".[1]

Onslow's father, Arthur, was a politician, as was his maternal grandfather Thomas Foote, who had served as the Lord Mayor of London in 1649. He was born in Surrey and attended St Edmund Hall, Oxford before being called to the Inner Temple, but entered Parliament as the Member for Guildford in 1679 before he could be called to the bar. One of Onslow's first actions as a member of Parliament was to support the Exclusion Bill, which aimed, unsuccessfully, to deny the Catholic James II of England the British throne. He was re-elected in 1685. He also served as a Lord of the Admiralty from 1690 to 1693.[2]

Onslow was an active back-bencher during his early years in Parliament, and his increasing notoriety as a moderate Whig led to him being nominated for the position of Speaker in 1700 when the member for Surrey. He was unsuccessful in this bid, losing out to the Tory candidate, Robert Harley. However, Onslow managed to attain the position of Speaker seven years later, in 1708. He proved to be a poor Speaker as he made no effort whatsoever to show any kind of neutrality, a fact which upset all but the most fervent Whigs. Onslow's pedantry as Speaker also enhanced his unpopularity. The most famous incident during his Speakership came during the trial of the preacher Dr. Henry Sacheverell, in which Onslow played a large part. When Onslow took the Commons to the House of Lords to hear their judgment on the case he challenged Black Rod on a trifling point of privilege, delaying the proceedings somewhat, which infuriated almost everyone in attendance. Onslow's unpopularity by this point was such that he failed to retain his seat in the 1710 election. In order to remain in the Commons he was forced to sit instead for the rotten borough of St Mawes.

Onslow regained much of his political favour four years later, now restored as the member for Surrey. Upon the death of Queen Anne in 1714 Onslow was a vocal advocate of a Protestant successor, in return for his support Onslow was rewarded by being named as Chancellor of the Exchequer, a position he held for around a year before resigning. He became Father of the House in 1713, and was created Baron Onslow on 19 July 1716.

He served as Lord Lieutenant of Surrey from 1716 until his death the following year. He had married Elizabeth, the daughter and heiress of Sir Henry Tulse, Lord Mayor of London, with whom he had two sons and two daughters. He was succeeded by his son Thomas.

References

  1. ^ Dasent, Arthur Irwin (1911). The Speakers of the House of Commons from the earliest times to the present day. London:  
  2. ^ "ONSLOW, Sir Richard, 3rd Bt. (1654-1717), of Clandon, Surr". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 2012-11-12. 

External links

  • Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Arthur Onslow
Thomas Dalmahoy
Member of Parliament for Guildford
1679–1689
With: Thomas Dalmahoy 1679
Morgan Randyll 1679–1685
Heneage Finch 1685–1689
Succeeded by
Foot Onslow
John Weston
Preceded by
Sir Adam Browne, Bt
Sir Edward Evelyn, Bt
Member of Parliament for Surrey
1689–1707
With: George Evelyn 1689–1690
Sir Francis Vincent, Bt 1690–1695
Denzil Onslow 1695–1689
John Weston 1698–1702
Leonard Wessell 1701–1705
Sir William Scawen 1705–1707
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Parliament of England
Member of Parliament for Surrey
1707–1710
With: Sir William Scawen
Succeeded by
Lord Guernsey
Sir Francis Vincent, Bt
Preceded by
John Smith
Speaker of the House of Commons of Great Britain
1708–1710
Succeeded by
William Bromley
Preceded by
Francis Godfrey
John Tredenham
Member of Parliament for St Mawes
1710–1713
With: John Tredenham 1710–1711
John Anstis 1711–1713
Succeeded by
Edward Rolt
Francis Scobell
Preceded by
Denzil Onslow
Morgan Randyll
Member of Parliament for Guildford
1713–1714
With: Morgan Randyll
Succeeded by
Morgan Randyll
Denzil Onslow
Preceded by
Lord Guernsey
Sir Francis Vincent, Bt
Member of Parliament for Surrey
1713–1715
With: Lord Guernsey
Succeeded by
Lord Guernsey
Thomas Onslow
Preceded by
Thomas Strangways
Father of the House
1713–1715
Succeeded by
Thomas Erle
Political offices
Preceded by
William Wyndham
Chancellor of the Exchequer of Great Britain
1714–1715
Succeeded by
Robert Walpole
Preceded by
The Lord De La Warr
Teller of the Exchequer
1715–1717
Succeeded by
The Lord Torrington
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Duke of Argyll
Lord Lieutenant of Surrey
1716–1717
Succeeded by
The Lord Onslow
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Baron Onslow
1716–1717
Succeeded by
Thomas Onslow
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
Arthur Onslow
Baronet
(of West Clandon, Surrey)
1688–1717
Succeeded by
Thomas Onslow
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