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Rodeo Cheeseburger

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Rodeo Cheeseburger

Main article: Burger King products

This is a list of the major products sold by the international fast-food restaurant chain Burger King.

Burgers

Whopper

Main article: Whopper

The Whopper sandwich is the signature hamburger product sold by the international fast-food restaurant chain Burger King and its Australian franchise Hungry Jack's. Introduced in 1957, it has undergone several reformulations including resizing and bread changes. The burger is one of the best known products in the fast food industry; it is so well known that Burger King bills itself as the Home of the Whopper in its advertising and signage. Additionally, the company uses the name in its high-end concept, the BK Whopper Bar. Due to its place in the marketplace, the Whopper has prompted Burger King's competitors, mainly McDonald's and Wendy's, to try to develop similar products designed to compete with it.

The company markets several variants of the burger as well as other variants that are specifically tailored to meet local taste preferences or customs of the various regions and countries in which it does business. To promote continuing interest in the product, Burger King occasionally releases limited-time variants on the Whopper. As the signature product of the company, it is often at the center of advertising promotions, product tie-ins, and even corporate practical jokes and hoaxes. Some of the early twenty-first century advertising programs, particularly in Europe, have drawn criticism for cultural insensitivity or misogyny. Additionally, as the signature product in the company's portfolio, Burger King has registered many global trademarks to protect its investment in the product.

BK Big King

Big King
Big King
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich (196 g)
Energy 490 kcal (2,100 kJ)
Carbohydrates 32 g (11%)
- Sugars 7 g
- Dietary fiber 2 g (8%)
Fat 28 g (43%)
- saturated 11 g (60%)
- trans 1 g
Protein 27 g
Sodium 700 mg (47%)
Cholesterol 85 mg
All data displayed follow the Canadian Food and Drug Act and Regulation regarding the rounding of nutritional data.
Percentages are roughly approximated
using Burger King Canada

The Big King sandwich is a hamburger, consisting of two grilled beef patties, sesame seed bun, King Sauce, iceberg lettuce, onions, pickles and two slices of American cheese. The Big King originally was configured identically to the McDonald's Big Mac with the three piece roll. It was reformulated later as a standard double burger. The product was discontinued in United States after the late 1990s, but it returned to said market in November 2013 as a permanent product; the product is also available in several other countries. The sandwich will be made in the similar way as the original version with the three-piece roll.[1]

History

Originally, the burger had a look and composition that resembled the Big Mac: it had two beef patties, "King" sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles and onions on a three-part sesame seed bun. Because its patties are flame-broiled and larger than McDonald's grill fried, seasoned hamburger patties and the different formulation of the "King Sauce" vs. McDonald's "Special sauce", the sandwich had a similar, but not exact, taste and different caloric content. Burger King eventually reformulated the sandwich to use a standard hamburger roll, presumably as a cost measure.

Initially named the Double Supreme Cheeseburger and released in 1993, the sandwich was renamed the Big King and reintroduced in 1996.[2] In 2001, the company re-branded it to the current King Supreme name as part of a menu reorganization designed to better compete with a similar planned menu expansion at McDonald's early the next year.[3] While the sandwich was discontinued in the United States in 2003, sales continued in Canada and parts of Europe. The sandwich was also modified in Canada and parts of South and Central America to include as single patty version and a larger version, called the King Supreme XXL, in Europe. The larger version drew the ire of the Spanish government because its overly large portion size, including an 8 oz (230 g) pre-cooked portion of hamburger, and high levels of fat, calories and sodium.[4]

Advertising

The King Supreme debut with an advertising campaign created by the McCaffery Ratner Gottlieb & Lane agency which featured blues legend B.B. King. The ads pushed the companies lunch and dinner periods as the best time to have the sandwich and had King doing a voice over in which he alternately talked or sang about the sandwiches.[5]

The company's online advertising program in Spain stated that the BK XXL line as being made "with two enormous portions of flame-broiled meat that will give you all the energy you need to take the world by storm." This claim combined with the television advertising were the prime motivators behind the Spanish government's concerns with the XXL sandwich line. The government claimed that campaign violated an agreement with the government to comply with an initiative on curbing obesity by promoting such a large and unhealthy sandwich. In response to the government's claims, Burger King replied in a statement: "In this campaign, we are simply promoting a line of burgers that has formed part of our menu in recent years. Our philosophy can be summed up with the motto 'As you like it,' in which our customers' taste trumps all." The company went on to say the it offers other healthier items such as salads and that customers are free to choose their own foods and modify them as they desire.[4]

BK Stacker

Double BK Stacker
A BK Double stacker
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich (190 g)
Energy 560 kcal (2,300 kJ)
Carbohydrates 32 g
- Sugars 5 g
- Dietary fiber 1 g
Fat 39 g
- saturated 16 g
- trans 1.5 g
Protein 34 g
Sodium 1100 mg (73%)
Energy from fat 350 kcal (1,500 kJ)
Cholesterol 125 mg
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

The BK Stacker sandwiches are a family of hamburgers featuring the same toppings that targets the late-teen–to–young-adult and male-oriented demographic groups.[6][7][8] It is a cheeseburger consisting of anywhere from one to four 1.7 oz (48 g) grilled beef patties, American cheese, bacon and Stacker sauce served on a sesame seed bun.

History

The BK Stacker was first introduced in the summer of 2006.[6] The chain garnered media attention due to the size of the sandwiches, particularly the Quad, and the large amount of calories and fat that the sandwich had (see the Enormous Omelet Sandwich breakfast sandwich.) In a November 2006 menu revision, the Double BK Stacker has become a numbered Value meal item in North America, with the number varying by market area. The BK Stacker, renamed the BBQ Beef Stacker, was introduced by Hungry Jacks in Australia in March 2007, available in single, double and triple sizes.

The Stacker line was updated in 2011. The stacker line was moved to the value menu with a reformulated ingredient list by deleting the top layer of cheese.[9] The changed pricing structure created a situation where the distribution of ingredients doesn't scale at the same rate as increasing numbers of burger patties. Two single Stackers at one dollar include more cheese and more bacon than one double Stacker for two dollars. Three single Stackers have 50% more cheese and double the bacon of one triple Stacker.[10]

Advertising

The BK Stacker was introduced using commercials that employed groups of little people in the roles of members of the "Stackers Union". The characters were "Vin," played by Danny Woodburn, "the new guy," and various members of the "Stackers Union" construction team that work in a BK kitchen assembling the sandwiches. The tag line was "Meat, Cheese and Bacon- Stacked High". As exemplified in the advertising campaign, part of the sandwich's concept revolves around not having vegetables like lettuce, onions, or tomatoes.[6]

Variants

Hungry Jack's offers a similar sandwich called the BBQ Beef Stack that features single, double and triple sized burgers along with a fried egg and a proprietary BBQ sauce called "Jack Sauce."[6]

BK Toppers

Mushroom and Swiss
BK Topper
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich (144 g)
Energy 410 kcal (1,700 kJ)
Carbohydrates 27 g
- Sugars 4 g
- Dietary fibre 1 g
Fat 27 g
- saturated 9 g
- trans 1 g
Protein 16 g
Sodium 850 mg (57%)
Energy from fat 180 kcal (750 kJ)
Cholesterol 55 mg
May vary outside US market.
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

The BK Toppers line was a line of cheeseburgers introduced in October 2011 as limited time offer. The sandwiches featured a new 3.2 oz (91 g) chopped beef patty that features a coarser grind than the company's 2 oz (57 g) hamburger patty. The three sandwiches in the line were the Cheeseburger Deluxe, Mushroom and Swiss, Bacon and Cheddar, and Western BBQ. The sandwiches were a part of the new ownership's plans to expand its customer base beyond the 18-34 year-old demographic which it had been targeting over the previous several years.[11] The product resurrected a previous name from the BK Hot Toppers line of sandwiches from the 1980s.[12] They were removed from the menu in July 2012.

Advertising

The company used its advertising firm of McGarryBowen and a food-centric campaign to introduce the products.[11][13] The ads feature the tag line of More beef, more value, with the television commercials utilizing images of the ingredients of the sandwiches as they are being prepared.[11][14]

Variants

The sandwiches consisted of:

  • Deluxe: American cheese, lettuce, onions, pickles and Stacker sauce;
  • Mushroom and Swiss: mushrooms, Swiss cheese and Griller sauce;
  • Western BBQ: onion rings, American cheese and Sweet Baby Ray’s Spicy BBQ sauce.
  • Bacon Cheddar; bacon, processed Cheddar cheese, mayonnaise, pickle and ketchup


Rodeo cheeseburger

Rodeo Cheeseburger
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich (139 g)
Energy  ?
Carbohydrates 40 g
- Sugars 9 g
- Dietary fiber 2 g
Fat 19 g
- saturated 8 g
- trans 1.5 g
Protein 17 g
Vitamin A equiv. 35 μg (4%)
Vitamin C 0 mg (0%)
Iron 1.9 mg (15%)
Sodium 630 mg (42%)
Energy from fat 180 kcal (750 kJ)
Cholesterol 30 mg
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

The Rodeo Cheeseburger is a cheeseburger that is one of Burger King products targeting the value conscious demographic. It consists of a burger patty, American cheese, three onion rings, and barbecue sauce served on a sesame-seed bun.

History

The Rodeo Cheeseburger was created to coincide with the release of the film Small Soldiers in 1998.[15] It was advertised using a parody of the Tom Cruise film A Few Good Men. In the commercial, Chip Hazard quoted Jack Nicholson's line "you can't handle the truth" as "you can't handle the Rodeo Burger."

Although discontinued nationally in the U.S., the Rodeo Cheeseburger can still be found regionally in some locations as part of Burger King's value menu.[16] It is also available in parts of Europe, South America and New Zealand.

In 2007, BK switched its barbecue sauce from Bulls-Eye to Sweet Baby Ray's Barbecue sauce.[17]

Variants


Chef's Choice burger

Chef's Choice Burger
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich (277 g)
Energy 770 kcal (3,200 kJ)
Carbohydrates 41 g
- Sugars 8 g
- Dietary fiber 2 g
Fat 50 g
- saturated 21 g
- trans 5 g
Protein 39 g
Vitamin A equiv. 35 μg (4%)
Vitamin C 0 mg (0%)
Iron 1.9 mg (15%)
Sodium 1820 mg (121%)
Energy from fat 450 kcal (1,900 kJ)
Cholesterol 125 mg
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

The Chef's Choice burger was a cheeseburger that was one of Burger King's products targeting the "indulgent" segment of the burger market. It consisted of a burger patty made from ground chuck, American cheese, bacon, red onion, romaine lettuce, tomato and a "griller sauce" sauce served on a brioche bun.

History

The Chef's Choice was introduced in October 2011 of new owner 3G Capital's menu restructuring.[18] The sandwich is a premium burger designed to compete with McDonald's Angus Third Pounder and Wendy's Dave's Hot 'N Juicy Cheeseburgers.[19] Introduced as part of 3G capitals menu restructuring, the sandwich features Burger King revamped bacon that replaced its former poorly rated bacon which the company's executive chef John Koch described as not deliving a "whole lot of bacon flavor." The new bacon is thicker cut, with natural smoked flavoring and is cooked in-house.[20] The sandwich was removed from the menu in mid-2012.

Advertising

The company again used the advertising firm of McGarryBowen to promote the sandwich through its food-centric campaign.[11][13][21] The advertising program and naming of the product is designed to add to the cache of the product by associating with the terminology with higher quality products.[22]

Chicken and fish

Original Chicken Sandwich

The Original Chicken Sandwich is a chicken sandwich sold by Burger King, and it is the "basic" chicken sandwich sold by the company. The Original Chicken Sandwich consists of a breaded, deep-fried white-meat chicken patty with mayonnaise and lettuce on a sesame seed sub-style bun.

The Original Chicken Sandwich was introduced in 1978 as part of BKs "Specialty Sandwich" line.[23] The products were some of the first by the company to attempt to capture the adult-oriented market, members of which would be willing spend more on a higher quality product.[24] The sandwiches were a part of a plan by the then-company president Donald Smith to expand Burger King's menu to reach the broadest demographic in order to better compete with McDonald's and fend off Wendy's growing market share.[25] Other sandwiches in the line included veal Parmesan, ham & cheese, steak & cheese, and a new version of its fish sandwich called the Long Fish. The Long Fish was eventually discontinued and replaced with the Whaler sandwich and the Steak Burger sandwich was discontinued all together, although two different steak sandwiches made from steak fillets or restructured beef were introduced as limited time offerings. The ham and cheese sandwich replaced an earlier version ham and cheese sandwich called the Yumbo that was served hot and was the size of a hamburger. Additional variations on the Original Chicken Sandwich have also been added over the years, including chicken Parmesan and chicken cordon bleu.[26]


Grilled chicken sandwiches

Main article: BK grilled chicken sandwiches

Burger King has introduced a variety of grilled chicken sandwiches to its products portfolio since its first iteration was introduced 1990. Originally known as the BK Broiler, the sandwich was modified in 2002 as part of the forty-fifth anniversary of the Whopper sandwich. BK changed the name of the sandwich to the Chicken Whopper and added a smaller Chicken Whopper Jr. sandwich along with a new Caesar salad sandwich topped with a Chicken Whopper patty.[27][28][29] In 2004, BK introduced its BK Baguette line of sandwiches that replaced the Chicken Whopper.[30][31] The sandwiches were introduced at the insistence of the new CEO, former Darden Restaurants executive Bradley (Brad) Blum, shortly after the company was acquired by TPG Capital in 2002.[31] The Chicken Baguette line was intended as a new health conscious oriented product that got its taste from ingredients instead of fat.[30] The sandwiches failed to catch on in the American market, and as a result they were discontinued as part of a menu reorganization. In 2005, they were replaced by the TenderGrill sandwich.[32][33] While the TenderGrill is the standard offering in its home market, some of its international markets still utilize the older Chicken Whopper name for the product. The TenderGrill sandwich was introduced by its former ownership group as part of a series of sandwiches designed to expand Burger King's menu with both more sophisticated, adult oriented fare and present a larger, meatier product that appealed to 24-36 adult males.[34]

Fish Sandwiches

Fish Sandwich (US)
The BK Big Fish.
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich (196 g)
Energy 640 kcal (2,700 kJ)
Carbohydrates 66g
- Sugars 9g
Fat 32g
- saturated 5g
- trans .5g
Protein 23g
Sodium 1370 mg (91%)
cholesterol 45mg
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

Burger King sells a fish sandwich in all of its markets. The Premium Alaskan Fish Sandwich is the American offering of the sandwich and consists of a deep-fried white fish patty, Tartar sauce and lettuce on a bakery-style bun.

History

The original fish sandwich sold by Burger King was called The Whaler. Not all franchisees added it to their menus at the same time, but is was available in at least some locations in the mid-1960s.[35] Available nationally by the mid-1970s, advertising featured the tag line The Genuine Burger King Fish-steak Sandwich.[36][37] It was a small sized fish sandwich made with Tartar sauce and lettuce on a sesame-seed bun.[38][39] When Burger King introduced its broiled chicken sandwich, the BK Broiler, it changed the fish sandwich's breading to a panko style and used the same oatmeal dusted roll for the BK Broiler. As part of the reformulation, the company renamed it to the Ocean Catch fish sandwich.[40]

When Burger King reformulated its BK Broiler grilled chicken sandwich into a larger, more male-oriented sandwich served on a Whopper bun, it also reformulated the Ocean Catch as the BK Big Fish. The new fish sandwich was a larger product with an increased patty size and served on a Whopper bun as well. Other than the increased size of the patty and bun, the other ingredients remained the same.[2]

Burger King replaced the BK Big Fish with the smaller BK Fish sandwich when it introduced its Chicken Baguette line of sandwiches. The new sandwich basically brought back the Whaler fish sandwich, adding a slice of American cheese. In 2005, The BK Big Fish was reintroduced when Burger King again reformulated its broiled chicken sandwich to the TenderGrill chicken sandwich.[41]

In 2012, the BK Big Fish was modified to include the bakery-style bun and was renamed the Premium Alaskan Fish Sandwich in the United States. BK Big Fish is still used in Canada and other markets.

Advertising

Burger King used many advertising programs to promote its fish sandwiches over the life of the product. As part of its push against its competitors in a 1983 campaign, the company released an ad indirectly comparing the product to the Filet-O-Fish sandwich from rival McDonald's. In the ad, BK claimed its product was larger by weight than the competitions product. The company expanded on the claim in a press statement, saying that the commercial is toned down from its 1982 comparison commercials.[42]

Crispy chicken sandwich

Crispy chicken sandwich
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich
Energy 460 kcal (1,900 kJ)
Carbohydrates 35g
- Sugars 4g
Fat 30g
- saturated 5g
- trans 0g
Protein 13g
Sodium 810 mg (54%)
cholesterol 30mg
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

The Crispy chicken sandwich is a small fried chicken sandwich that consists of a fried chicken patty, lettuce and mayonnaise served on a sesame seed bun. It is one of the company's value oriented products. Since its introduction, there have been several variants released by the company.

History

The sandwich was introduced in 1998 as part of a menu expansion that added a value menu which the company dubbed the Great Tastes Menu.[43] Originally the sandwich was made with a 3 oz (85 g) chicken patty, mayonnaise, pickle on a sesame-seed roll. A parmigiana style sandwich with mozzarella cheese and marinara sauce called the Italian Crispy chicken sandwich was added later.[44] The sandwich was eliminated in the US in 2000 but revived in 2007 as the Spicy Crispy chicken sandwich. In March 2012 the company separated the sandwich into both the spiced patty version and the original un-spiced patty version.

Advertising

A 2007 advertising program for the spicy version of the sandwich used the Whoppers, a "family" in which all the males are actors wearing a Whopper sandwich costume. In the ad spot, the parents come home and find that their son is having a party, when confronted the son blames his friend "Spicy." When the father confronts Spicy, he finds Spicy making out with the Whopper's daughter. Further ads in the program uses featured Whopper Jr. and Spicy antagonizing other fast food chains, proclaiming that Burger King has a superior value menu.


Vegetarian

BK Veggie

BK Veggie sandwich
A BK Veggie combo meal from Germany.
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 209 g
Energy 410 kcal (1,700 kJ)
Carbohydrates 44 g
- Sugars 8 g
- Dietary fiber 7 g
Fat 16 g
- saturated 2.5 g
- trans 0 g
Protein 22 g
Sodium 1030 mg (69%)
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

The BK Veggie is a vegetarian soy-based meatless sandwich that is served at Burger King restaurants. The sandwich is not vegan, as it has dairy components, and is one of BK's health conscious oriented menu items. The BK Veggie is made with mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, and ketchup served on a sesame-seed bun. The patty is supplied by Morningstar Farms.[45] In Canada, the sandwich is prepared without mayo, while the patty is flame-broiled instead of being microwaved.

History

The product was first introduced in 2002, shortly before the company's acquisition by TPG Capital, as part of a menu expansion that included a revamped King Supreme and other products designed to better compete with a similar planned menu expansion at McDonald's early the next year.[3] It was originally prepared in the same manner as a Whopper, a flame-broiled veggie patty with lettuce, tomato, pickles, onion and ketchup served on a sesame-seed roll. However, unlike the Whopper, which features regular mayonnaise, a separate low-fat mayonnaise was utilized. Currently, the BK Veggie is prepared with regular mayonnaise. At the time the sandwich was vegan if the customer asked to have it cooked in a microwave oven, otherwise it was not considered vegan because it was cooked on the same equipment as the burgers and chicken.[46] At the time of its introduction, the sandwich was hailed by many as a way to not only give vegetarians more options, but as a healthy alternative that gave all consumers more choices in meal options. The Center for Science in the Public Interest lauded the sandwich's low fat content, but derided the company's other menu items introduced at the time as being unhealthy.[47] In 2005, CSPI observed, "too bad you can’t order it with less than 930 mg of sodium," which, while an increase from the 760 or 730 mg in the sandwich in 2002, was still less than the 1100 mg in the sandwich today [June 2010].

In late 2004, BK (US) entered into a partnership with Kellogg's Morningstar Farms division to offer a soy-based meatless patty. The sandwich was reformulated not to include pickles and onions, and in order to address concerns raised by vegetarian groups, the cooking method was also changed to microwaving to prevent cross-contamination with meat products.[46][48]

Classification

In UK outlets of Burger King, the BK Veggie was approved by the Vegetarian Society. Subsequently, on the menu boards, a 'Vege society approved' logo was shown next to the item name. The UK burger is also vegan when ordered without mayonnaise or cheese.[49] In the US the sandwich was approved by PETA, who not only welcomed the BK Veggie as a way to give vegetarians more choice, but also hailed the company's recent agreement with the group to seek out suppliers that employ humane treatment methods in raising their animal stock.[50][51]

However, Burger King in the US publishes a disclaimer which states: "Burger King Corporation makes no claim that the BK Veggie Burger or any other of its products meets the requirements of a vegan or vegetarian diet. The patty is cooked in the microwave."[52]

Advertising

The use of a corporate cross-promotion helped drive sales by giving the Morningstar Farms brand increased exposure and sales opportunities, while Burger King promotes an existing, trusted brand name which aids marketing efforts and encourages consumers to try the BK Veggie.[53]

Naming and trademarks

The name BK Veggie is a registered trademark of Burger King Holdings and is displayed with the "circle-R" (®) symbol in the US and Canada.

Spicy bean burger

Spicy Bean Burger
A spicy bean burger combo meal from the UK.
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich (247 g)
Energy 506 kcal (2,120 kJ)
Carbohydrates 62 g
- Sugars 9 g
- Dietary fiber 9 g
Fat 20 g
- saturated 6 g
Protein 19 g
Sodium 1278 mg (85%)
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source:

The Spicy Bean burger is a fried sandwich sold by the international fast-food restaurant chain Burger King in parts of the European and Asian markets. It does not contain any meat but may be fried in the same oil as the fish products.

Product description

The Spicy Bean Burger consists of a deep-fried, breaded bean-based patty, with ketchup, tomato, and American cheese on a 7 inch (20 cm) long sesame seed bun.

Other

Summer 2010 Ribs LTO

In the Summer of 2010, Burger King took the unusual step of adding St. Louis style pork ribs to its summer-time menu. The ribs, 3" long, bone-in ribs, sold for about $8 order and were extremely successful. The company sold out of its project ten-week run in just over eight weeks. The company began running out of its packaging halfway into the promotion.[54][55]

The company's new broiling units were one of the key pieces in the success of the product; the new flexible batch broilers were able to be cook the ribs in a relatively short period.[54]

Advertising

The Advertising campaign was produced by Crispin, Porter + Boguski and featured flying pigs convincing customers that a fast food restaurant could in fact produce good barbecue ribs at a reasonable price.[55]

Summer BBQ LTO programs

The summer of 2012 saw the introduction of series of limited-time, summer-oriented products. Included in the new menu were a pulled pork sandwich and variations on its Whopper and TenderCrisp chicken sandwiches; each of these new products are based on regional barbecue styles from Tennessee, the Carolinas and Texas. Rounding out the products are an ice cream sundae topped with bacon, sweet potato fries, and frozen lemonade.[56] The products are part of Burger King's ownership group plans to reverse sagging sales and diminished market share. Additionally, the new products were designed to ward off increased competition across the fast food burger restaurant industry from chains such as Five Guys and Smashburger.[57]

The Summertime BBQ menu returned in 2013, with the pulled pork sandwich, the Carolina BBQ sandwiches variants be continued. In place of the Texas BBQ sandwich variants and bacon sundae was a new BBQ rib sandwich and a series of desserts and milkshakes based on Oreo cookie products from Kraft Foods.

References

See also

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