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San Francisco general election, November 2004

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Title: San Francisco general election, November 2004  
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Subject: California Courts of Appeal election, 1998, California elections, 1998, California elections, 2009, California elections, June 2010, California Proposition 14 (2010)
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San Francisco general election, November 2004

The November 2004 San Francisco general elections were held on November 2, 2004, in San Francisco, California. The elections included seven seats to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, four seats to the San Francisco Community College Board, four seats to the San Francisco Board of Education, and fourteen San Francisco ballot measures.

Board of Supervisors

Propositions

Propositions: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNO
Note: "City" refers to the San Francisco municipal government.

Proposition A

Proposition A would allow the City to issue $200 million in bonds to finance the purchase and maintenance of affordable housing and housing assistance for low- and moderate-income households. This measure required a two-thirds majority to pass.
Proposition A
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 116,706 35.80
Yes 209,259 64.20
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 325,965 90.09
Invalid or blank votes 35,857 9.91
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition B

Proposition B would allow the City to issue $60 million in bonds to finance the purchase and maintenance of historical resources owned by the City and the San Francisco Unified School District. This measure required a two-thirds majority to pass.
Proposition B
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 134,896 42.61
Yes 181,658 57.39
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 326,554 87.49
Invalid or blank votes 45,268 12.51
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition C

Proposition C would establish the Health Service System as a separate City department and allow the Health Service Board to appoint and remove the manager for the System.
Proposition C
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 166,651 56.33
No 129,210 43.67
Valid votes 295,861 81.77
Invalid or blank votes 65,961 18.23
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition D

Proposition D would change the City Charter regarding the Board of Supervisors by changing deadlines and vote requirements, restrictions on the number of aides, and commissioners' length of service after terms have expired.
Proposition D
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 162,385 57.89
Yes 118,123 42.11
Valid votes 280,508 77.52
Invalid or blank votes 81,314 22.47
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition E

Proposition E would have the City pay to the survivors of a police officer or firefighter who dies in the line of duty 100% of the retirement benefits entitled to the officer or firefighter.
Proposition E
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 210,091 66.01
No 108,193 33.99
Valid votes 318,284 87.97
Invalid or blank votes 43,538 12.03
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition F

Proposition F would allow adult noncitizen parents, guardians, and caregivers with children in the San Francisco Unified School District to vote in San Francisco Board of Education elections.
Proposition F
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 164,924 51.45
Yes 155,643 48.55
Valid votes 320,567 88.60
Invalid or blank votes 41,255 11.40
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition G

Proposition G would allow the City to authorize the Health Services Board to establish health plans for City residents.
Proposition G
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 201,674 66.81
No 100,206 33.19
Valid votes 301,880 83.43
Invalid or blank votes 59,942 16.57
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition H

Proposition H would name the stadium at Candlestick Point as Candlestick Park, effectively forbidding future naming rights contracts for the current stadium.
Proposition H
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 170,217 54.54
No 141,904 45.46
Valid votes 312,121 86.26
Invalid or blank votes 49,701 13.73
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition I

Proposition I would create an Office of Economic Analysis, which will analyze proposed legislation and report its impact on the economy, and have the City create a long-term Economic Development Plan.
Proposition I
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 154,022 51.92
No 142,650 48.08
Valid votes 296,672 81.99
Invalid or blank votes 65,150 18.01
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition J

Proposition J would increase the sales tax by ¼%.
Proposition J
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 182,477 58.11
Yes 131,529 41.89
Valid votes 314,006 86.78
Invalid or blank votes 47,816 13.22
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition K

Proposition K would create a temporary 0.1% gross receipts tax and clarify the City's payroll expense tax for certain business entities.
Proposition K
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 162,910 54.67
Yes 135,068 45.33
Valid votes 297,978 82.35
Invalid or blank votes 63,844 17.65
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition L

Proposition L would set aside 15% of hotel tax surcharge revenues for the acquisition, preservation, and maintenance of neighborhood and single-screen movie theaters and to promote the local film industry.
Proposition L
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 229,487 74.59
Yes 78,157 25.41
Valid votes 307,644 85.03
Invalid or blank votes 54,178 14.97
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition M

Proposition M would prohibit the razing of buildings containing 20 or more habitable units. This measure was struck from the ballot due to a technicality.[1]

Proposition N

Proposition N would make it City policy to urge the federal government to withdraw all troops from Iraq.
Proposition N
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 195,257 63.33
No 133,053 36.67
Valid votes 328,310 90.74
Invalid or blank votes 33,512 9.26
Total votes 361,822 100.00

Proposition O

Proposition O would make it City policy to use the sales tax funds from Proposition J for low-income residents and the homeless.
Proposition O
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 181,340 59.65
No 122,644 40.35
Valid votes 303,984 84.01
Invalid or blank votes 57,838 15.98
Total votes 361,822 100.00

References

  1. ^ Herel, Suzanne (September 3, 2004). "Measure to stop demolition off ballot". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved December 22, 2009. 

External links

  • San Francisco Department of Elections
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