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San Francisco general election, November 2011

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Title: San Francisco general election, November 2011  
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San Francisco general election, November 2011

The November 2011 San Francisco general elections were held on November 8, 2011 in San Francisco, California. The elections included those for San Francisco mayor, district attorney, and sheriff, and eight ballot measures.

Mayor

District attorney

San Francisco Police Department appointed by then-Mayor Gavin Newsom to replace Kamala Harris, ran for his first election.

San Francisco district attorney election, 2011[1]
Candidate Votes Percentage
incumbent) 75,628 41.61%
David Onek 42,765 23.53%
Sharmin Bock 37,717 20.75%
Bill Fazio 19,072 10.49%
Vu Vuong Trinh 6,555 3.61%
Write-in 0 0%
Valid votes 181,737 93.04%
Invalid or blank votes 13,586 6.96%
Total votes 195,323 100%
Voter turnout 42.46%
Ranked choice voting — Pass 3
George Gascón (incumbent) 99,480 62.39%
David Onek 59,976 37.61%
Eligible votes 159,456 81.64%
Exhausted votes 35,867 18.36%
Total votes 195,323 100%
Candidate Pass 1 Pass 2 Pass 3
George Gascón 75,628 83,146 99,480
David Onek 42,765 46,997 59,976
Sharmin Bock 37,717 43,965
Bill Fazio 19,072
Vu Vuong Trinh 6,555
Write-in 0
Eligible Ballots 181,737 174,108 159,456
Exhausted Ballots 13,586 21,215 35,867
Total 195,323 195,323 195,323

Sheriff

Incumbent Sheriff Michael Hennessey did not seek reelection.[2]

San Francisco sheriff election, 2011[3]
Candidate Votes Percentage
Ross Mirkarimi 69,605 38.36%
Chris Cunnie 51,146 28.18%
Paul Miyamoto 49,414 27.23%
David Wong 11,305 6.23%
Write-in 0 0%
Valid votes 181,470 92.91%
Invalid or blank votes 13,853 7.09%
Total votes 195,323 100%
Voter turnout 42.46%
Ranked choice voting — Pass 3
Ross Mirkarimi 85,608 53.25%
Paul Miyamoto 74,548 46.55%
Eligible votes 160,156 82.00%
Exhausted votes 35,167 18.00%
Total votes 195,323 100%
Candidate Pass 1 Pass 2 Pass 3
Ross Mirkarimi 69,605 71,613 85,608
Paul Miyamoto 49,414 53,933 74,548
Chris Cunnie 51,146 52,745
David Wong 11,305
Write-in 0
Eligible Ballots 181,470 178,291 160,156
Exhausted Ballots 13,853 17,032 35,167
Total 195,323 195,323 195,323

Propositions

Propositions: ABCDEFGH
Note: "City" refers to the San Francisco municipal government.

Proposition A

Proposition A would authorize the San Francisco Unified School District to issue up to $531 million in bonds, funded by a property tax increase, to modernize and repair school facilities, and create a citizens' oversight committee to monitor expenditures. This proposition required a majority of 55% to pass.
Proposition A
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 134,695 71.10
No 54,750 28.90
Required majority 55.00
Valid votes 189,445 96.31
Invalid or blank votes 7,251 3.69
Total votes 196,696 100.00

Proposition B

Proposition B would authorize the City to issue $248 million in bonds for the repair and improvement of streets, bicycling paths, and pedestrian and traffic infrastructure. This proposition required a two-thirds majority to pass.
Proposition B
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 129,123 68.01
No 60,733 31.99
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 189,856 96.52
Invalid or blank votes 6,840 3.48
Total votes 196,696 100.00

Proposition C

Proposition C would adjust pension contribution rates for current and future City employees, implement limits on future pension benefits and increases, require all City employees to contribute to their retiree health care costs, among other changes to the City pension system. This was submitted to the ballot to counter Proposition D below.
Proposition C
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Yes 129,511 68.90
No 58,445 31.10
Valid votes 187,956 95.56
Invalid or blank votes 8,740 4.44
Total votes 196,696 100.00

Proposition D

Proposition D would adjust pension contribution rates for current and future City employees, implement limits on future pension benefits and increases, prohibit the City from picking up the cost of employee's contributions to pension benefits, among other changes to the City pension system. This was submitted to the ballot to counter Proposition C above.
Proposition D
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 124,002 66.54
Yes 62,349 33.46
Valid votes 186,351 94.74
Invalid or blank votes 10,345 5.26
Total votes 196,696 100.00

Proposition E

Proposition E would allow ballot measures submitted by the Mayor or the Board of Supervisors on or after January 1, 2012, and subsequently approved by voters, to be amended or repealed by two-thirds of the Board three years after passage, and by a majority seven years after passage.
Proposition E
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 121,202 67.13
Yes 59,356 32.87
Valid votes 180,558 91.80
Invalid or blank votes 16,138 8.20
Total votes 196,696 100.00

Proposition F

Proposition F would decrease disclosure requirements of campaign consultants to the San Francisco Ethics Commission.
Proposition F
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 98,761 56.11
Yes 77,240 43.89
Valid votes 176,001 89.48
Invalid or blank votes 20,695 10.52
Total votes 196,696 100.00

Proposition G

Proposition G would increase the sales tax by 0.5% for a period of ten years or until the California state government instates a sales tax hike of 1% or more for at least one year. This proposition required a two-thirds majority to pass.
Proposition G
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 100,490 53.88
Yes 86,033 46.12
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 186,523 94.83
Invalid or blank votes 10,173 5.17
Total votes 196,696 100.00

Proposition H

Proposition H would make it City policy that school admissions be based primarily on the student's proximity to neighborhood schools.
Proposition H
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 91,629 50.03
Yes 91,514 49.97
Valid votes 183,143 93.11
Invalid or blank votes 13,553 6.89
Total votes 196,696 100.00

References

  1. ^ http://www.sfelections.org/results/20111108/data/da.html
  2. ^ Gordon, Rachel (February 19, 2011). "S.F. Sheriff Michael Hennessey says he'll retire". San Francisco Chronicle. p. C-2. Retrieved August 17, 2011. 
  3. ^ http://www.sfelections.org/results/20111108/data/sheriff.html

External links

  • San Francisco Department of Elections
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