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Scott Young (ice hockey, born 1967)

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Title: Scott Young (ice hockey, born 1967)  
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Language: English
Subject: EV Landshut players, 1986 NHL Entry Draft, Clinton, Massachusetts, Hartford Whalers draft picks, Boston University Terriers men's ice hockey players
Collection: 1967 Births, American Ice Hockey Right Wingers, Boston University Terriers Men's Ice Hockey Players, Colorado Avalanche Players, Dallas Stars Players, Ev Landshut Players, Frankfurt Lions Players, Hartford Whalers Draft Picks, Hartford Whalers Players, Ice Hockey People from Massachusetts, Ice Hockey Players at the 1988 Winter Olympics, Ice Hockey Players at the 1992 Winter Olympics, Ice Hockey Players at the 2002 Winter Olympics, Living People, Medalists at the 2002 Winter Olympics, Mighty Ducks of Anaheim Players, National Hockey League First Round Draft Picks, Olympic Ice Hockey Players of the United States, Olympic Medalists in Ice Hockey, Olympic Silver Medalists for the United States, People from Clinton, Massachusetts, Pittsburgh Penguins Players, Quebec Nordiques Players, St. Louis Blues Players, St. Mark's School (Massachusetts) Alumni, Stanley Cup Champions
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Scott Young (ice hockey, born 1967)

Scott Young
Born (1967-10-01) October 1, 1967
Clinton, MA, USA
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Right Wing
Shot Right
Played for Hartford Whalers
Pittsburgh Penguins
Quebec Nordiques
Colorado Avalanche
Anaheim Mighty Ducks
St. Louis Blues
Dallas Stars
National team  United States
NHL Draft 11th overall, 1986
Hartford Whalers
Playing career 1988–2006

Scott Allen Young (born October 1, 1967) is a retired American professional ice hockey right winger. He is currently the varsity ice hockey coach at St. Mark's School in Southborough, Massachusetts.

Contents

  • Playing career 1
  • Awards and achievements 2
  • Career statistics 3
    • Regular season and playoffs 3.1
    • International 3.2
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Playing career

Young gained attention as a star hockey player while still in high school. He played his prep school hockey at St. Mark's School in Southborough, Massachusetts, playing with teammates that included fellow future-NHL players Doug and Greg Brown. His play allowed him to play with the United States in the World Junior Ice Hockey Championship in 1985, the beginning of a long international career representing the United States. Following the championship Young went to play for the Boston University Terriers. He played there two years, winning rookie of the year honors in 1986. Young was also drafted by the Hartford Whalers in the first round, 11th overall in the 1986 NHL Entry Draft while still in college.

For the 1987–88 season, Young spent the majority of the season with the U.S. National team. In addition to playing on the national team Young played in the 1988 Winter Olympics and made his debut with the Whalers, playing in seven games. The following season he played full time with the Whalers, scoring 59 points in 79 games. Young played one more full season with the Whalers and played half of the 1990–91 season with the Whalers before being traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins. Young helped the Penguins win the Stanley Cup in 1991.

For the 1991–92 season Young spent the majority of the year playing in Italy in addition to a brief stint with the U.S. National Team and representing the U.S. in the 1992 Winter Olympics. Prior to 1992–93 season Young returned to the NHL and was traded by the Penguins to the Quebec Nordiques. He played three seasons with the Nordiques and remained on the team when they moved to Colorado and became the Colorado Avalanche. He played two seasons with the Avalanche and won his second Stanley Cup with the Avalanche in 1996. Prior to the 1997–98 season, Young was traded to the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim and played one season with the Ducks. The next offseason Young signed with the St. Louis Blues.

In his first stint with the Blues he played four seasons, enjoying the best season of his career in 2000–01 season, scoring 73 points and 40 goals, both career highs and the only time Young attained 40 goals in a season. Young also represented the U.S. once again in the 2002 Winter Olympics. Prior to the 2002–03 season Young signed with the Dallas Stars and played two years with them.[1] Following the cancelled 2004–05 season lockout, Young rejoined the Blues for the 2005–06 campaign.[2] While the Blues finished last in the league that year, Young proved that he was still a strong hockey player, leading the team with 49 points. Following the season, Young retired from hockey. Young finished his career with 1181 career NHL games, 342 goals and 414 assists for 756 points.

In 2011, Young returned to St. Mark's School, this time as the coach of the boys' varsity team for which he once played. As a coach, Young has had three winning seasons, two Barber Tournament championships and two Boys' Holiday Showcase championships.

In September 2015, Young was promoted to assistant ice hockey coach on head coach David Quinn's staff at Boston University. He returned to Commonwealth Ave. in 2014 to become the director of men's ice hockey operations for the Terriers.

Awards and achievements

  • 1986: Hockey East Rookie of the Year
  • 1987: World Junior Championship All-Star Team
  • 1991: Stanley Cup with the Pittsburgh Penguins
  • 1996: Stanley Cup with the Colorado Avalanche

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1985–86 Boston University HE 38 16 13 29 31
1986–87 Boston University HE 33 15 21 36 24
1987–88 U.S. National Team Intl 56 11 47 58 31
1987–88 Hartford Whalers NHL 7 0 0 0 2 4 1 0 1 0
1988–89 Hartford Whalers NHL 76 19 40 59 27 4 2 0 2 4
1989–90 Hartford Whalers NHL 80 24 40 64 47 7 2 0 2 2
1990–91 Hartford Whalers NHL 34 6 9 15 8
1990–91 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 43 11 16 27 33 17 1 6 7 2
1991–92 U.S. National Team Intl 10 2 4 6 21
1991–92 HC Bolzano ITL 18 22 17 39 6 5 4 3 7 7
1992–93 Quebec Nordiques NHL 82 30 30 60 20 6 4 1 5 0
1993–94 Quebec Nordiques NHL 76 26 25 51 14
1994–95 Frankfurt Lions DEL 1 1 0 1 0
1994–95 Landshut EV DEL 4 6 1 7 6
1994–95 Quebec Nordiques NHL 48 18 21 39 14 6 3 3 6 2
1995–96 Colorado Avalanche NHL 81 21 39 60 50 22 3 12 15 10
1996–97 Colorado Avalanche NHL 72 18 19 37 14 17 4 2 6 14
1997–98 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 73 13 20 33 22
1998–99 St. Louis Blues NHL 75 24 28 52 27 13 4 7 11 10
1999–00 St. Louis Blues NHL 74 24 15 39 18 6 6 2 8 8
2000–01 St. Louis Blues NHL 81 40 33 73 30 15 6 7 13 2
2001–02 St. Louis Blues NHL 67 19 21 40 26 10 3 0 3 2
2002–03 Dallas Stars NHL 79 23 19 42 30 10 4 3 7 6
2003–04 Dallas Stars NHL 53 8 8 16 14 4 1 0 1 2
2004–05 Memphis Riverkings CHL 3 2 1 3 0
2005–06 St. Louis Blues NHL 79 18 31 49 52
NHL totals 1181 342 414 756 448 141 44 43 87 64

International

Medal record
Competitor for  United States
Men's ice hockey
Winter Olympics
2002 Salt Lake City
World Junior Championships
1986 Hamilton
Year Team Event Result GP G A Pts PIM
1985 United States WJC 6th 7 1 2 3 4
1986 United States WJC 7 1 3 4 8
1987 United States WJC 4th 7 7 2 9 2
1987 United States WC 7th 4 0 1 1 2
1988 United States OG 7th 6 2 6 8 4
1989 United States WC 6th 10 0 7 7 6
1992 United States OG 4th 8 2 1 3 2
1994 United States WC 4th 8 3 1 4 4
1996 United States WCH 7 2 2 4 4
2002 United States OG 6 4 0 4 2
Junior totals 21 9 7 16 14
Senior totals 49 13 18 31 24

See also

References

  1. ^ "Young signs two-year deal with Stars".  
  2. ^ "Scott Young is returning to the Blues".  

External links

  • Scott Young's career statistics at The Internet Hockey Database
  • Scott Young's biography at Legends of Hockey
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Ken Hodge
Hockey East Rookie of the Year
1985–86
Shared With
Al Loring
Succeeded by
Brian Leetch
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Dana Murzyn
Hartford Whalers first round draft pick
1986
Succeeded by
Jody Hull
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