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Secret Santa

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Title: Secret Santa  
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Subject: Christmas, Christmas Party (The Office), Christmas in Romania, Sinterklaas, Christmas traditions
Collection: Articles Containing Video Clips, Christmas Traditions, Giving
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Secret Santa

Secret Santa is a Western Christmas tradition in which members of a group or community are randomly assigned a person to whom they anonymously give a gift.

Harmony Deriving from the Christian tradition, the ritual is known as Secret Santa in the United States and the United Kingdom; as Kris Kringel or Kris Kindle (Christkindl) in Ireland; as Secret Santa, Kris Kringle, Chris Kindle (Christkindl) or Engerl-Bengerl in parts of Austria; as Secret Santa or Kris Kringle in Canada and Australia; as Secret Santa, Kris Kringle, or Monito-monita in the Philippines; and as "Wichteln" in Germany. "Wichteln" is what a "Wichtel", a wight, does, a good deed. In Poland, the tradition is celebrated on the day of 6 December (Mikołajki).[1][2] All of these names derive from traditional Christmas gift-bringers: the American custom is named after Santa Claus, or St Nicholas (Poland), while Chris Kindle and Kris Kringle are both corruptions of the original name of the Austrian gift-bringer Christkindl, which means the "Christ Child". Exceptions are the UK (where the traditional gift-bringer is Father Christmas) and the Philippines (which has the Three Kings). Most places in Latin America use amigo secreto (secret friend) or amigo invisible (invisible friend). In Israel, this game is called גמד וענק (A Dwarf and a Giant) and is mostly played during Purim.

The term Pollyanna is used in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey. [3][4]

College students choose names for Secret Santa and exchange gifts

Contents

  • Variations 1
    • Thieving Secret Santa/Stealing Secret Santa 1.1
    • Secret Casino Santa 1.2
    • Conspiracy Santa 1.3
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Variations

Thieving Secret Santa/Stealing Secret Santa

In this version, participants (players) bring one gift each which is potentially suitable or interesting to any of the other participants. The gifts should be wrapped in such a way as to disguise their nature. Ideally, the provider of each gift should not be disclosed when setting up the game. Players take turns, and can either open a new gift, or steal a previously opened gift. This game is also known as the white elephant gift exchange, or Yankee Swap.[5]

Secret Casino Santa

In this version, each person buys a gift for specific amount, not for anyone specifically. Each person also puts in a specific amount of money into a pot. Who goes first in gift selection can be determined by random selection. The options are:

Option A: Choose a gift
Option B: Do not choose a gift, and go for Money.
Option C: Put your name in to win all the unwanted gifts by those who went for Option B.

At the end, the gifts that were chosen are opened and the winner of the money and leftover gifts are drawn.[6]

Conspiracy Santa

In this version, participants engage in a "conspiracy" where all participants work together to select a gift for a single participant without that participant's direct involvement or knowledge. Many such individual "conspiracies" run concurrently, one for each participant. Email threads or web apps are commonly used to manage each "conspiracy" until a consensus is made, wherein the gift is purchased by a decided upon participant and given at a later date. A common theme of Conspiracy Santa is collectively learning about participants, making it popular for workplaces.[7]

See also

  • Derangement - Calculating the number of possible outcomes.

References

  1. ^ http://www.obliczakultury.pl/publicystyka/obyczaje-swiata/1506-mikolajki-6-grudnia
  2. ^ http://www.mowimyjak.pl/styl-zycia/uroczystosci/kim-jest-sw-mikoaj-skad-sie-wzia-zwyczaj-kupowania-prezentow-na-6-grudnia,87_34412.html
  3. ^ 10/01/2014 12:30 pm EST (2014-10-01). "Secret Santa Gift Exchange". sassysanta.com. 
  4. ^ http://www.daredictionary.com/view/dare/ID_00044656
  5. ^ "Yankee Swappers play gift game". CapeCodOnline.com. 23 December 2007. Retrieved 2011-01-07. 
  6. ^ "Secret Santa". InGoodCompany.co.za. 26 December 2009. Retrieved 2011-09-21. 
  7. ^ "Sick of Secret Santa? Try Conspiracy Santa". PCMag.com. 21 November 2014. Retrieved 2014-11-21. 

External links

  • Secret Santa Online Multi-platform application to organize online games.
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