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Sekere

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Title: Sekere  
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Subject: Alamu Atatalo, Apala, Yoruba music, Arrondissements of Benin, Agidigbo
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Sekere

The musical instrument Shekere.

This article is about the musical genre. For the musical instrument, see Shekere.

Sekere is a traditional Yoruba musical genre that was pioneered and popularized by the late Alhaji Alamu Atatalo from Ibadan, Nigeria. Cowrie shells are wound around a large and polished gourd; the musician violently shakes the sekere (shaker) and also uses his fists to beat the gourd thereby creating a percussive sound that gladdens and delights the spectators. Typically accompanied by other instruments, such as the aro, dundun, omele, agogo, agidigbo, and a chorus; in Yorubaland -- especially in Ibadan, the sekere musician sometimes shows off his dexterity by hoisting the instrument high up in the air and briskly catches it in mid-air to create a festive mood.

It is noteworthy to mention that sekere, as a musical genre, is quite different from those smaller shakers (with different spellings) found in Cuba, Brazil, and other parts of Africa. The instrument described here is unique to the Yorubaland of Nigeria especially Ibadan.

Sekere Musicians

External links

  • Women's Sekere Ensemble
  • Build Your Own or Buy a Custom Sekere - All things Sekere


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