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Soft diet

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Soft diet

A Mechanical soft diet is recommended in many situations, including some types of dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), surgery involving the jaw, mouth or gastrointestinal tract, and pain from newly adjusted dental braces. This diet is often confused with the soft diet that is a regular diet but without fibers, spiced foods, and highly fatty foods (some people may call it light diet).

A Mechanical soft diet can include many or most foods if they are mashed, pureed, combined with sauce or gravy, or simmered in liquid.

In some situations, there are additional restrictions. For example, patients who need to avoid excessive reflux, such as those recovering from esophageal surgery for achalasia, are also instructed to stay away from foods that can aggravate reflux, which include ketchup and other tomato products, citrus fruits, chocolate, mint, spicy foods, alcohol, and caffeine.

Many of the foods listed here can be adapted for a "full liquid" diet (not a "clear liquid" diet) by processing in a blender with an appropriate thinning liquid such as a vegetable or meat broth, fruit or vegetable juice, or milk.

Contents

  • Grains/starches 1
  • Protein 2
  • Fruits and vegetables 3
  • Desserts 4
  • See also 5

Grains/starches

Protein

Fruits and vegetables

Desserts

See also

  • NIDCD information on dysphagia
  • Soft Diets for Gastroenterological Medicine
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