World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Solar traffic light

Article Id: WHEBN0033123410
Reproduction Date:

Title: Solar traffic light  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Solar cell phone charger, Traffic signals, Photovoltaics, Solar notebook, Solar-powered fountain
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Solar traffic light

Solar Energy Powered Traffic Light
Solar Energy Powered Traffic Light

Solar traffic lights are signalling devices powered by solar panels positioned at road intersections, pedestrian crossings and other locations to control the flows of traffic. They assign the right of way to road users by the use of lights in standard colors (red - amber/yellow - green), using a universal color code (and a precise sequence to enable comprehension by those who are color blind). Most of the solar traffic lights have battery back-up for functioning during night.

Features

Solar Energy Powered School Traffic Light
Solar Energy Powered School Traffic Light

Solar Panel Battery Enclosure on Traffic Light
Solar Panel Battery Enclosure on Traffic Light

Most solar traffic lights use LED lamps as they are more reliable[1] and have more advantages over other lighting devices like CFL lamps as they are more energy efficient, have a longer life span and turn on and turn off quickly.[2] Solar traffic lights contain enclosures which house the batteries and the control panel circuitry.[3] Existing traffic lights can also be upgraded with an auxiliary power source using solar panels for use during power failures.[4] The other parts in a solar traffic light include a charge controller to control the charging and discharging of the battery and a countdown timer which displays the amount of time left before the battery discharges fully.[5]

Solar traffic light as an auxiliary system

Auxiliary solar traffic lights, in addition to the existing street lights, can be attached near the primary street lights. They are useful in regulating traffic when the primary system fails. The control system in the auxiliary traffic light monitors the primary system and when the primary system fails, it switches to the auxiliary system. Switching from primary system to the auxiliary system and vice versa can also be achieved using a hand-held transmitter unit.[6]

Solar traffic light during natural disasters

Portable, Solar Powered, Traffic Light used when construction workers must narrow a 2way street to a single lane and must emplace traffic controls for safety.
Portable, Solar Powered, Traffic Light used when construction workers must narrow a 2way street to a single lane and must emplace traffic controls for safety.

Solar traffic lights can also be used during periods following natural disasters, when the existing street lights may not function due to power outages and the traffic is uncontrollable. Street lights used in such scenarios are designed to be portable enough to be carried and operated by police and relief workers wherever traffic needs to be regulated.[7]

Advantages

  • Solar traffic lights are self-sufficient as they do not require external power sources.[8]
  • They are easy to set up and operate.[8]
  • They require very little to no maintenance as they have no moving parts.[8]

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^ a b c
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.