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South Carolina's congressional districts

 

South Carolina's congressional districts

South Carolina's congressional districts since 2013[1]

There are currently seven United States congressional districts in South Carolina. There have been as few as four and as many as nine congressional districts in South Carolina. The 9th district and the 8th district were lost after the 1840 Census. Because the state exceeded the nation's average population growth in the 2010 Census, South Carolina regained its 7th district, which had remained unused since the Civil War.

The 5th district and the 6th district were also briefly lost after the Civil War, but both had been regained by the 1880 Census.

Contents

  • Current districts and representatives 1
  • District cities and counties 2
    • First Congressional District 2.1
    • Second Congressional District 2.2
    • Third Congressional District 2.3
    • Fourth Congressional District 2.4
    • Fifth Congressional District 2.5
    • Sixth Congressional District 2.6
    • Seventh Congressional District 2.7
  • Historical and present district boundaries 3
  • Obsolete districts 4
    • Eighth Congressional District 4.1
    • Ninth Congressional District 4.2
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Current districts and representatives

List of members of the South Carolinian United States House delegation, their terms, their district boundaries, and the districts' political ratings according to the CPVI. The House delegation has 6 members, including 5 Republicans and 1 Democrat.[2] South Carolina's 1st seat was vacant briefly in 2013, after incumbent Tim Scott was elected to the United States Senate.

District Representative Party CPVI Incumbency District map
1st Mark Sanford (R-Charleston) Republican R+11 2001, May 7, 2013 – present
2nd Joseph Wilson (R-Columbia suburbs) Republican R+14 December 18, 2001 – present
3rd Jeff Duncan (R-Laurens) Republican R+16 January 3, 2011 – present
4th Trey Gowdy (R-Greenville) Republican R+15 January 3, 2011 – present
5th Michael Mulvaney (R-Rock Hill) Republican R+9 January 3, 2011 – present
6th Jim Clyburn (D-Charleston/Columbia) Democratic D+17 January 3, 1993 – present
7th Tom Rice (R-Myrtle Beach) Republican R+7 January 3, 2013 – present

District cities and counties

2012 election results, showing partisan membership

First Congressional District

Counties

Cities

Second Congressional District

Counties

Cities

Third Congressional District

Counties

Cities

Fourth Congressional District

Counties

Cities

Fifth Congressional District

Counties

Cities

Sixth Congressional District

Counties

Cities

Seventh Congressional District

The Seventh Congressional District seat was eliminated after the 1930 U.S Census. It was re-established after the 2010 U.S. Census indicated population changes necessitated another representative to better serve the needs of the people in this area.

Counties

Cities

Historical and present district boundaries

Table of United States congressional district boundary maps in the State of South Carolina, presented chronologically.[3] All redistricting events that took place in South Carolina between 1973 and 2013 are shown.

Year Statewide map Charleston highlight
1973 – 1982
1983 – 1992
1993 – 2002
2003 – 2013
Since 2013

Obsolete districts

Eighth Congressional District

The Eighth Congressional District seat was eliminated after the 1840 census.

Ninth Congressional District

The Ninth Congressional District seat was eliminated after the 1840 census.

See also

References

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  2. ^ http://www.house.gov/representatives/#state_sc
  3. ^ "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789-2012.". Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
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