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South Pacific tropical cyclone season

The South Pacific tropical cyclone climatology is a record of how many tropical disturbances, tropical cyclones (TC's) and severe tropical cyclones (STC's) have formed within the Southern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone basin each year. The Southern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone basin is currently defined as being between 160°E and 120°W and is officially monitored by the World Meteorological Organization's Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in Nadi, Fiji and Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand, while others like the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also monitor the basin. Each tropical cyclone year within this basin starts on July 1 and runs throughout the year, encompassing the tropical cyclone season which runs from November 1 and lasts until April 30 each season. Within this region a tropical disturbance is classified as a tropical cyclone, when it has 10-minute sustained wind speeds of more than 65 km/h (35 mph), that wrap halfway around the low level circulation centre, while a severe tropical cyclone is classified when the maximum 10-minute sustained wind speeds are greater than 120 km/h (75 mph).

Within the basin, most tropical cyclones have their origins within the South Pacific Convergence Zone or within the Northern Australian monsoon trough, both of which form an extensive area of cloudiness and are dominant features of the season.

Pre-1970

1970s

Season Total
TD's
Total
TC's
Total
STC's
Strongest
storm
Deaths Damages Notes and
References
1969–70 7 7 2 [1]
1970–71 8 8 0
1971–72 13 13 11 [2]
1972–73 10 10 2
1973–74 11 11 2
1974–75 5 5 3 [2]
1975–76 10 10 5
1976–77 10 10 2
1977–78 8 8 3 [1]
1978–79 6 6 3
1979–80 7 7 1 [1]

1980s

During the 1980s there were three major Southern Oscillation episodes; two El Niño's (1982–83 and 1986/87) when the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) was negative and one La Nina when the SOI was positive.[3]

Season Total
TD's
Total
TC's
Total
STC's
Strongest
storm
Deaths Damages Notes and
References
1980–81 14 14 4 [3]
1981–82 6 6 5 [3][4]
1982–83 16 14 10 Oscar [3]
1983–84 8 8 3 Beti [2][3]
1984–85 9 9 5 Hina [3][4]
1985–86 10 10 4 Ima >150 [2][3]
1986–87 13 12 6 Uma 50 [1][3]
1987–88 6 5 3 Anne [1][3]
1988–89 14 14 6 Harry [3]
1989–90 11 6 2 Ofa 8 [3]
Totals 108 99 48

1990s

Season Total
TD's
Total
TC's
Total
STC's
Strongest
storm
Deaths Damages Notes and
References
1990–91 5 3 1 Sina None [4][A 1]
1991–92 12 11 7 Fran 21 [1][A 2]
1992–93 10 10 6 Joni/Prema None [1]
1993–94 7 5 4 Theodore None
1994–95 3 2 0 William None [1][5][6]
1995–96 6 4 1 Beti 2 [7][8]
1996–97 13 12 6 Gavin 27 [A 3][4]
1997–98 20 16 7 Ron/Susan 50 [11][12]
1998–99 27 8 4 Dani [12][13]
1999-00 24 6 4 Kim 1 [12][14]
Totals 127 77 38 Ron/Susan 101

2000s

During the 2000s, activity was generally below the long term average, with 60 tropical cyclones developing out of 160 tropical disturbances and tropical depressions. However activity during the 2002-03, 2004-05 and 2009-10 seasons all experienced activity, near the long term average of about 8 - 9 tropical cyclones.

Season Total
TD's
Total
TC's
Total
STC's
Strongest
storm
Deaths Damages
(USD)
Notes and
References
2000–01 16 4 1 Paula 7 [2][12]
2001–02 16 5 2 Waka 1 [4][12]
2002–03 18 10 7 Zoe 50 [12][15]
2003–04 15 3 2 Heta 16 [12]
2004–05 19 9 5 Percy 2 [12][1][16]
2005–06 15 5 3 Wati None [12][2][17]
2006–07 15 6 2 Xavier 4 [12]
2007–08 16 4 3 Daman 8 [12][18]
2008–09 15 6 0 Lin 11 [12][2][19]
2009–10 15 8 5 Ului 12 [1][12]
Totals 160 60 30 Zoe 111

2010s

Season Total
TD's
Total
TC's
Total
STC's
Strongest
storm
Deaths Damages
(USD)
Notes and
References
2010–11 17 8 5 Wilma 4 [12][20]
2011–12 20 3 1 Jasmine 13 [21]
2012–13 21 5 4 Sandra 16
2013–14

See also

Tropical cyclones portal

Notes

References

External links

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