World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Spencer Hawes

Article Id: WHEBN0006036323
Reproduction Date:

Title: Spencer Hawes  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: 2013–14 Cleveland Cavaliers season, 2012 NBA Playoffs, 2010–11 Philadelphia 76ers season, 2011–12 Philadelphia 76ers season, Philadelphia 76ers
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Spencer Hawes

Spencer Hawes
Hawes (left) with the 76ers
No. 00 – Charlotte Hornets
Position Center / Power forward
League NBA
Personal information
Born (1988-04-28) April 28, 1988
Seattle, Washington
Nationality American
Listed height 7 ft 1 in (2.16 m)
Listed weight 245 lb (111 kg)
Career information
High school Seattle Preparatory
(Seattle, Washington)
College Washington (2006–2007)
NBA draft 2007 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10th overall
Selected by the Sacramento Kings
Pro career 2007–present
Career history
20072010 Sacramento Kings
20102014 Philadelphia 76ers
2014 Cleveland Cavaliers
2014–2015 Los Angeles Clippers
2015–present Charlotte Hornets
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Spencer Mason Hawes (born April 28, 1988) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Charlotte Hornets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was selected by the Sacramento Kings in the 2007 NBA draft and is the nephew of Steve Hawes, a retired NBA player.[1]

High school career

Hawes played Center (basketball) at Seattle Prep, an elite college-prep school in Seattle, Washington. The team won the state championship in the 2005–06 season and Hawes was named the tournament MVP. He might have entered the 2006 NBA Draft had the NBA not enacted a new rule requiring players to wait a year after their class graduates from high school. Following the 2005–06 season, Hawes was selected as an Associated Press All-American, McDonald's All-American, Parade All-American, and USA Today All-American.[2] He was also named 2006 Gatorade Boys Basketball Washington Player of the Year and Seattle Times player of the year.

Considered a five-star recruit by Rivals.com, Hawes was listed as the No. 2 center and the No. 6 player in the nation in 2006.[3]

USA Basketball

Hawes debuted for USA Basketball in April 2006 as a member of the 2006 USA Junior National Select Team that defeated the World Select Team 109–91 at the Nike Hoop Summit in Memphis, Tenn.

In the Summer of 2006, Hawes led all scorers with 24 points and added 10 rebounds, contributing to a United States men's team victory over Argentina in the gold medal game of the FIBA Americas under-18 Championship by a score of 104–82.[4] Overall, Hawes averaged 12.0 points and 7.5 rebounds during the tournament. The U.S. team was coached by Hawes' eventual college coach, Lorenzo Romar.

College career

Hawes attended and played at the University of Washington, where his uncle, Steven, and his father, Jeff, both played basketball. Hawes led the Huskies in scoring with 14.9 points per game, ranked 10th in the Pac-10. Hawes also ranked second on the Huskies with 6.4 rebounds per game, ninth in the Pac-10. Spencer Hawes set a school record for freshmen with 461 points, despite missing one game due to a left ankle sprain. This record was later broken by Isaiah Thomas.

Hawes scored 20 or more points nine times, while posting three double-doubles. He was also named to the Pac-10 all-freshman team.[5]

NBA career

Sacramento Kings (2007–2010)

Hawes makes a foul shot against the Phoenix Suns on 27 January 2014

Hawes was projected to go as high as fifth overall to the Celtics to as low as twelfth overall to the 76ers.[6] He was drafted by the Sacramento Kings with the 10th overall pick in the 2007 NBA draft.

Hawes played sparingly in his rookie season of 2007/2008. Although appearing in 71 games, he started only 8 and averaged 13.1 minutes per game. He averaged a modest 4.7 points, 3.3 rebounds, and .6 blocks per game with a .459 field goal percentage.

In his second season as a pro, opportunities opened up for Hawes when the starting center Brad Miller was traded to the Chicago Bulls. Hawes' numbers went up in every major statistical category, at 11.4 points, 7.1 rebounds, and 1.2 blocks per game with a .466 field goal percentage in 29.3 minutes per game. Hawes also started in 51 games, but missed the final game of the season due to an injury that occurred from a flagrant foul assessed to Kenyon Martin of the Denver Nuggets.[7] The foul would result in controversy as Kings co-owner, Joe Maloof, would later state, "That (the hard foul) was thuggery, and you can quote me on that."[8]

Philadelphia 76ers (2010–2014)

On June 17, 2010 he was traded along with Andres Nocioni to the Philadelphia 76ers for center Samuel Dalembert.[9] Hawes ended the 2010-11 NBA season having averaged 7.2 points per game.

On March 16, 2013 Hawes recorded 18 points, 16 rebounds, 8 assists and 7 blocks in a win against the Indiana Pacers.[10]

On November 22, 2013, Hawes recorded 25 points, 12 rebounds, and 2 assists in a 115-107 OT victory over the Milwaukee Bucks. Hawes hit a clutch three pointer with 3.9 seconds left on the clock to send the game to overtime.[11] In the 2013-14 season, Hawes was ranked 12th for three point field goal percentage in 2013–14.[12]

Cleveland Cavaliers (2014)

On February 20, 2014, Hawes was traded to the Cleveland Cavaliers in exchange for Earl Clark, Henry Sims and two future second-round picks.[13]

Los Angeles Clippers (2014–2015)

On July 9, 2014, Hawes signed with the Los Angeles Clippers.[14] He had a 15-game starting stretch during February and March while teammate Blake Griffin recovered from a staph infection. During this stretch, he tied his season-high of 17 points in a loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder on February 8.[15]

Charlotte Hornets (2015–present)

On June 15, 2015, Hawes was traded, along with Matt Barnes, to the Charlotte Hornets in exchange for Lance Stephenson.[16]

NBA career statistics

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2007–08 Sacramento 71 8 13.1 .459 .190 .655 3.2 .6 .2 .6 4.7
2008–09 Sacramento 77 51 29.3 .466 .348 .662 7.1 1.9 .6 1.2 11.4
2009–10 Sacramento 72 59 26.4 .468 .299 .689 6.1 2.2 .4 1.2 10.0
2010–11 Philadelphia 81 81 21.2 .465 .243 .534 5.7 1.5 .4 .9 7.2
2011–12 Philadelphia 37 29 24.9 .489 .250 .727 7.3 2.6 .4 1.3 9.6
2012–13 Philadelphia 82 40 27.2 .464 .356 .777 7.2 2.2 .3 1.4 11.0
2013–14 Philadelphia 54 53 31.3 .451 .399 .782 8.5 3.3 .6 1.3 13.0
2013–14 Cleveland 27 25 29.8 .468 .448 .784 7.7 2.4 .5 1.0 13.5
2014–15 L.A. Clippers 73 15 17.5 .393 .313 .647 3.5 1.2 .3 .7 5.8
Career 573 361 23.9 .459 .351 .699 6.0 1.9 .4 1.0 9.2

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2011 Philadelphia 5 5 19.6 .364 .000 .500 3.8 1.8 .0 .4 5.2
2012 Philadelphia 13 12 25.5 .463 .400 .731 6.6 1.6 .3 .8 9.3
2015 L.A. Clippers 8 0 7.1 .529 .500 1.000 1.6 .6 .3 .4 2.9
Career 26 17 18.7 .449 .417 .719 4.5 1.3 .2 .6 6.5

Personal

Hawes is a conservative Lars Larson Show, a conservative radio talk show.

See also

References

  1. ^ NBA.com: 2007 NBA Draft Board-Spencer Hawes
  2. ^ All-USA basketball team
  3. ^ Spencer Hawes Recruiting Profile
  4. ^ NBA.com Profile Spencer Hawes
  5. ^ ESPN Hawes Only Plays One Year at Washington
  6. ^ ESPN Hawes Only Plays One Year at Washington
  7. ^ Kings C Hawes done for season
  8. ^ Joe Maloof irate at Martin for way he fouled Hawes
  9. ^
  10. ^ Pacers at 76ers, March 16, 2013
  11. ^ Notebook: Sixers 115, Bucks 107 (OT)
  12. ^ NBA Player 3-Point Shooting Statistics - 2013-14
  13. ^ Cavs Acquire Spencer Hawes from 76ers
  14. ^ CLIPPERS SIGN FARMAR AND HAWES
  15. ^ Spencer Hawes 2014-15 Game Log
  16. ^
  17. ^ Scene stealers (cont.)

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from NBA.com, or Basketball-Reference.com
  • DraftExpress.com Profile
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.