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Staphylococcal infection

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Title: Staphylococcal infection  
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Subject: Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, Erysipelas, List of infectious diseases, Pathogenic bacteria, Duke University Hospital
Collection: Bacterial Toxins, Staphylococcaceae
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Staphylococcal infection

Staphylococcal infection
SEM micrograph of S. aureus colonies; note the grape-like clustering common to Staphylococcus species.
Classification and external resources
Specialty Infectious disease
MeSH D013203

Staphylococci are species of Gram-positive bacteria that can cause a wide variety of infections in humans and other animals through infection or the production of toxins. Staphylococcal toxins are a common cause of food poisoning, as they can be produced in improperly-stored food. Staphylococci are also known to be a cause of bacterial conjunctivitis.[1] Among neurosurgical patients, it can cause community-acquired meningitis.[2]

Contents

  • Types 1
  • Coagulase-positive 2
  • Coagulase-negative 3
  • Etymology 4
  • References 5

Types

Main Staphylococcus aureus infections
Type Examples
Localized skin infections

Diffuse skin infection

Deep, localized infections

Other infections

Toxinoses

Unless else specified in boxes, then reference is[3]

Other infections include:

  • Closed-space infections of the fingertips, known as paronychia.

Coagulase-positive

The main coagulase-positive staphylococcus is Staphylococcus aureus, although not all strains of Staphylococcus aureus are coagulase positive. These bacteria can survive on dry surfaces, increasing the chance of transmission. S. aureus is also implicated[4] in toxic shock syndrome; during the 1980s some tampons allowed the rapid growth of S. aureus, which released toxins that were absorbed into the bloodstream. Any S. aureus infection can cause the staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, a cutaneous reaction to exotoxin absorbed into the bloodstream. It can also cause a type of septicaemia called pyaemia. The infection can be life-threatening. Problematically, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, and is being, MRSA has also been recognized with increasing frequency in community-acquired infections.[5] The symptoms of a Staph Infection include a collection of pus, such as a boil or furuncle, or abscess. The area is typically tender or painful and may be reddened or swollen.[6]

Coagulase-negative

Etymology

The generic name Staphylococcus is derived from the Greek word "staphyle," meaning bunch of grapes, and "kokkos," meaning granule. The bacteria, when seen under a microscope, appear like a branch of grapes or berries.

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ Sahebnasagh R, Saderi H, Owlia P. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains from clinical samples in Tehran by detection of the mecA and nuc genes. The First Iranian International Congress of Medical Bacteriology; 4–7 September; Tabriz, Iran. 2011. 195 pp.
  6. ^
  7. ^


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