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Statistician

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Statistician

A statistician is someone who works with theoretical or applied statistics. The profession exists in both the private and public sectors. It is common to combine statistical knowledge with expertise in other subjects.

Nature of the work

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of 2010, 25,100 jobs were classified as statistician in the United States.[1] Of these people, approximately 30 percent worked for governments (federal, state, or local). Additionally, there is a substantial number of people who use statistics in their work but have job titles other than statistician,[2] such as actuaries, applied mathematicians, economists, financial analysts, psychometricians, epidemiologists, and quantitative psychologists.[3] The job of statistician is considered a profession. Most statisticians work in offices and have regular working hours and can therefore be considered white-collar workers. A minority of statisticians are self-employed statistical consultants.

Most employment as a statistician requires a minimum of a masters degree in statistics or a related field. Many professional statisticians have a PhD. Typical work includes collaborating with scientists, providing mathematical modeling, simulations, designing randomized experiments and randomized sampling plans, analyzing experimental or survey results, and forecasting future events (such as sales of a product).

See also

References

  1. ^ United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition. Statisticians:Employment
  2. ^ Statisticians
  3. ^ United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved 2007-10-03.

External links

  • Statistician entry, Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Careers Center, American Statistical Association
  • Careers information, Royal Statistical Society (UK)
  • Listing of tasks and duties - The International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO)
  • Listings of nature of work etc - O*NET


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