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Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

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Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development
Steinhardt
Established 1890
Type Private
Undergraduates 2200
Postgraduates 3700
Location New York City, New York, USA
Dean Mary Brabeck
Website steinhardt.nyu.edu

The Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development is one of 18 divisions within New York University and is the oldest professional school of education in the United States. It was known as New York University School of Education until 2001.

History

Founded in 1890 as the School of Pedagogy, New York University's Steinhardt School was the first professional school devoted to teacher education established at an American university. In 1910, the School established the first university chair in experimental education in the United States. From 1920 to 1930 the School saw an expansion in enrollment from 993 to over 9500 students. In 1930, the Education Building on Washington Square was opened and still serves as the School's home. The School was renamed the Steinhardt School of Education in 2001, honoring a $10 million donation—the largest the school had ever received—from Michael and Judy Steinhardt. Michael Steinhardt was a highly successful hedge-fund manager who is now retired. In March 2007 the school was renamed the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, to reflect the diverse nature of its academic programs.

Academics

The School enrolls roughly 7000 students each year—2400 undergraduates and 4300 full- and part-time masters, certificate, and doctoral students. Several hundred international students pursue graduate degrees at Steinhardt each year. The School employs more than 250 full-time faculty in 11 separate academic departments:

  • Department of Administration, Leadership, and Technology
  • Department of Applied Psychology
  • Department of Art and Art Professions
  • Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders
  • Department of Humanities and Social Sciences in the Professions
  • Department of Media, Culture, and Communication
  • Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions
  • Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health
  • Department of Occupational Therapy
  • Department of Physical Therapy
  • Department of Teaching and Learning

Steinhardt was home to the Division of Nursing until the fall of 2005, when the division became the College of Nursing within the College of Dentistry.

Steinhardt receives research funding exceeding $30 million annually. In the 2006 U.S. News Graduate School survey, the NYU Steinhardt is ranked # 11 among U.S. graduate schools for education; its programs in occupational therapy and music are frequently ranked among the top ten programs in the United States.

Admissions to Steinhardt is highly selective and competitive. The acceptance rate is about 25%.[1]

Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions

The Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions serves as the music conservatory for New York University. Almost all degree programs in music performance at NYU schools are located in the Department of Music. It employs more than 300 faculty and admits over 1,400 students from baccalaureate through doctoral. Founded in 1925, the department was one of the first in the United States to award a doctorate in Music Education. NYU Alumnus Wilfred Bain (NYU Master of Arts in Music 1936, NYU PhD Music Education 1938) was later called the Dean of Deans in United States schools serving as Dean of the University of North Texas College of Music (from 1938 to 1947) and the Indiana University School of Music (from 1947 to 1973). In 1968, the Steinhardt Music Department merged with New York College of Music, the oldest conservatory of music in New York City. In the 1970s, the school's name was changed to School of Education, Health, Nursing and Arts Professions.

Institute for Education and Social Policy

Institute for Education and Social Policy is a research institute founded in 1995 as part of New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and partners with the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. IESP specializes in quantitative analysis of large education data sets in order to "help inform educational institutions and policymakers about the effectiveness of instructional programs, the impact of school reform initiatives and the relationships between academic achievement, school finance and socio-economic and demographic factors such as poverty, ethnicity and immigration status."[2] IESP Fellows and affiliated faculty are employed at a variety of academic institutions and public enterprises including the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, D.C. Public Schools, and NYU School of Medicine. The current director is Amy Ellen Schwartz.[3]

Facilities

The School's research centers include the Institute for Education and Social Policy, the Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy, the Child and Family Policy Center, and the Metropolitan Center for Urban Education.

Rehearsal and performance facilities of the NYU Steinhardt on campus include the Frederick Loewe Theatre (300 seats), the Provincetown Playhouse (88 seats), and the Black Box Theatre (74 seats), as well as many smaller practice and rehearsal sites at the school.

Deans of Steinhardt

Notable Alumni

Department of Applied Psychology

Department of Media, Culture, and Communication

Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions:

Department of Teaching and Learning:

Notable faculty have included the late Neil Postman, guitarist John Scofield, singer Meg Bussert, and the pianist and composer Jacob Weinberg.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Infopop.cc
  2. ^ About the Institute - Institute for Education and Social Policy - NYU Steinhardt
  3. ^ People - Institute for Education and Social Policy - NYU Steinhardt
  4. ^ Levin, Neil M. Biography: Jacob Weinberg 1879–1956. Milken Archive. Retrieved 29 August 2014.

External links

  • Official website
  • New York University

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