Student-teacher

Not to be confused with student-teacher ratio.

A student teacher, pupil-teacher (historical) or prac teacher (practice teacher) is a college, university or graduate student who is teaching under the supervision of a certified teacher in order to qualify for a degree in education.

The term is also often used interchangeably with "Pre-Service Teacher". It is a much broader term to include those students that are studying the required coursework in pedagogy, as well as their specialty, but have not entered the supervised teaching portion of their training. In many institutions "Pre-Service Teacher" is the official and preferred title for all education students. [1]

Pupil teacher also used to refer to a senior pupil who acted as a teacher of younger children, which in the 19th and early 20th centuries was a common step on the road to becoming a professional teacher for intelligent boys and girls of poor background.

See also

References

Bibliography

  • Meyer-Botnarescue, H. and Machado, J. (2004) Student Teaching: Early Childhood Practicum Guide. Thomson Delmar Learning.
  • Grim, P.R. and Michaelis, J.U. (1953) The Student Teacher in the Secondary School. Prentice-Hall.
  • DellaValle, J. and Sawyer, E. (1998) Teacher Career Starter: The Road to a Rewarding Career. Career Starters.
  • Wiggins, S.P. (1958) The Student Teacher in Action. Allyn and Bacon Publishers.

External links

  • National Education Association
  • "Make It Happen: A Student's Guide"
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