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Substance intoxication

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Title: Substance intoxication  
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Substance intoxication

Substance intoxication
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 F10.0-F19.0
ICD-9-CM 305
MeSH D011041

Substance intoxication is a type of substance use disorder[1] which is potentially maladaptive and impairing, but reversible,[2] and associated with recent use.[3]

If the symptoms are severe, the term "substance intoxication delirium" may be used.[4] Generic slang terms include: getting high or being stoned or blazed (all usually in reference to cannabis), with many more specific slang terms for each particular type of intoxicant. Alcohol intoxication is even graded in intensity, from buzzed, to tipsy, all the way up to hammered, smashed, wasted and a number of other similar terms.

Classification

Examples (and ICD-10 code) include:

The term contact high is sometimes used to describe intoxication without direct administration, either by second-hand smoke as with cannabis, or by placebo in the presence of others who are high.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Substance intoxication" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
  2. ^ Michael B. First; Allen Frances; Harold Alan Pincus (2004). DSM-IV-TR guidebook. American Psychiatric Pub. pp. 135–.  
  3. ^ Michael B. First; Allan Tasman (2 October 2009). Clinical Guide to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders. John Wiley and Sons. pp. 146–.  
  4. ^ William H. Reid; Michael G. Wise (26 August 1995). DSM-IV training guide. Psychology Press. pp. 80–.  
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