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Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 400 metre individual medley

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Title: Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 400 metre individual medley  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 200 metre individual medley, United States at the 2000 Summer Olympics, 2000 Summer Olympics, Erik Vendt, Curtis Myden
Collection: Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics
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Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 400 metre individual medley

Men's 400 metre individual medley
at the Games of the XXVII Olympiad
Venue Sydney International Aquatic Centre
Date September 17, 2000 (heats & final)
Competitors 45 from 39 nations
Winning time 4:11.76 WR
Medalists
Gold medal    United States
Silver medal    United States
Bronze medal    Canada
Swimming events at the
2000 Summer Olympics
Freestyle
50 m   men   women
100 m men women
200 m men women
400 m men women
800 m women
1500 m men
Backstroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Breaststroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Butterfly
100 m men women
200 m men women
Individual medley
200 m men women
400 m men women
Freestyle relay
4×100 m men women
4×200 m men women
Medley relay
4×100 m men women

The men's 400 metre individual medley event at the 2000 Summer Olympics took place on 17 September at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre in Sydney, Australia.[1]

U.S. swimmer Tom Dolan blistered the entire field, and broke a six-year-old world record to successfully defend his Olympic title in the event. Acknowledging a massive roar from an Australian crowd, Dolan pulled away from the field on the backstroke leg, and then opened up his lead to a powerful finish in a sterling time of 4:11.76.[2][3] Dolan's teammate Erik Vendt came from last place on the first turn with a spectacular swim to take home the silver in 4:14.23, pulling off another top-two finish of the night for the Americans.[4] Meanwhile, Canada's Curtis Myden managed to repeat his bronze from Atlanta four years earlier in 4:15.33, handing a second straight medal haul for North America in the event's history.[5][6]

Leading earlier in the prelims, Italy's Alessio Boggiatto finished outside the podium by six-tenths of a second (0.60) in 4:15.93. South Africa's Terence Parkin, a deaf mute since birth, swam on the outside in lane eight, but pulled off a fifth-place effort in an African record of 4:16.92. He was followed in sixth spot by Australia's newcomer Justin Norris (4:17.87), and in seventh by Romania's Cezar Bădiță (4:20.91), who had been overshadowed in his presence by a doping ban before the start of the Games.[6] In May 2000, Badita failed a doping test for a steroid nandralone when he competed at the Mare Nostrum meet in Barcelona, Spain.[7][8] Japan's Shinya Taniguchi closed out the field to eighth place with a time of 4:20.93.[6]

Contents

  • Records 1
  • Results 2
    • Heats 2.1
    • Final 2.2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Tom Dolan (USA) 4:12.30 Rome, Italy 6 September 1994 [9]
Olympic record  Tamás Darnyi (HUN) 4:14.23 Barcelona, Spain 27 July 1992 [9]
The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.
Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
17 September Final Tom Dolan United States 4:11.76 WR

Results

Heats

[9]

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 3 Alessio Boggiatto Italy 4:14.26 Q, NR
2 6 4 Tom Dolan United States 4:15.52 Q
3 4 4 Curtis Myden Canada 4:16.35 Q
4 4 6 Cezar Bădiță Romania 4:17.11 Q, NR
5 5 4 Erik Vendt United States 4:17.15 Q
6 5 5 Justin Norris Australia 4:17.36 Q
6 5 2 Shinya Taniguchi Japan 4:17.36 Q, AS
8 5 6 Terence Parkin South Africa 4:18.14 Q, AF
9 5 7 Jirka Letzin Germany 4:18.63
10 6 6 István Batházi Hungary 4:18.85
11 5 3 Michael Halika Israel 4:19.97
12 4 5 Matthew Dunn Australia 4:20.31
13 6 5 Susumu Tabuchi Japan 4:20.76
14 4 7 Johann Le Bihan France 4:20.96
15 6 3 Frederik Hviid Spain 4:21.63
16 4 1 Dean Kent New Zealand 4:21.81
17 3 2 Alexey Kovrigin Russia 4:22.21
18 3 6 Yves Platel Switzerland 4:22.38
19 6 1 Massimiliano Eroli Italy 4:22.85
20 5 1 Ioannis Kokkodis Greece 4:23.19
21 6 7 Xie Xufeng China 4:23.33
22 3 4 Serghei Mariniuc Moldova 4:23.57
23 3 5 Jan Vítazka Czech Republic 4:23.81
24 4 2 Simon Militis Great Britain 4:24.38
25 5 8 Jin Hao China 4:24.56
26 4 8 Michael Windisch Austria 4:24.62
27 2 2 Jani Sievinen Finland 4:25.16
28 3 7 Dmytro Nazarenko Ukraine 4:25.26
29 6 2 Owen von Richter Canada 4:25.70
30 3 1 Marko Milenkovič Slovenia 4:26.62
31 2 4 Jeremy Knowles Bahamas 4:26.87
32 6 8 Torwai Sethsothorn Thailand 4:28.42
33 3 3 Kim Bang-Hyun South Korea 4:28.56
34 1 3 Alex Fong Hong Kong 4:29.02
35 3 8 Alejandro Bermúdez Colombia 4:29.42
36 2 3 George Bovell Trinidad and Tobago 4:29.52 NR
37 2 7 Juan Carlos Piccio Philippines 4:30.17
38 2 5 Juan Veloz Mexico 4:31.73
39 2 8 Grigoriy Matuzkov Kazakhstan 4:31.89
40 1 4 Georgi Palazov Bulgaria 4:35.92
41 2 1 Wan Azlan Abdullah Malaysia 4:36.90
42 2 6 Sandro Tomaš Croatia 4:38.31
43 1 5 Oussama Mellouli Tunisia 4:41.97
44 1 6 Hsu Kuo-Tung Chinese Taipei 4:42.78
45 1 2 John Tabone Malta 4:53.12

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st 5 Tom Dolan United States 4:11.76 WR
2nd 2 Erik Vendt United States 4:14.23
3rd 3 Curtis Myden Canada 4:15.33 NR
4 4 Alessio Boggiatto Italy 4:15.93
5 8 Terence Parkin South Africa 4:16.92 AF
6 1 Justin Norris Australia 4:17.87
7 6 Cezar Bădiță Romania 4:20.91
8 8 Shinya Taniguchi Japan 4:20.93

References

  1. ^ "Swimming schedule".  
  2. ^ "More fireworks in the pool".  
  3. ^ Clarey, Christopher (18 September 2000). "Dolan Sets World Mark in 400 Medley : U.S. Powers to 6 Medals On a Swimmers' Night".  
  4. ^ "Dolan, Munz overcome ailments to win".  
  5. ^ "Dolan breaks own world mark in 400 IM".  
  6. ^ a b c Whitten, Phillip (17 September 2000). "Olympic Day 2 Finals".  
  7. ^ Whitten, Phillip (17 September 2000). "Exclusive: Banned Swimmer Allowed To Compete".  
  8. ^ "Badita cleared for Olympics".  
  9. ^ a b c "Sydney 2000: Swimming – Men's 400m Individual Medley Heats" ( 

External links

  • Official Olympic Report
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