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Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay

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Title: Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay  
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Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay

Men's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay
at the Games of the XXVII Olympiad
Venue Sydney International Aquatic Centre
Dates September 16, 2000 (heats & final)
Competitors 100 from 23 nations
Winning time 3:13.67 WR
Medalists
Gold medal 
Silver medal 
Bronze medal 
Swimming events at the
2000 Summer Olympics
Freestyle
50 m   men   women
100 m men women
200 m men women
400 m men women
800 m women
1500 m men
Backstroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Breaststroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Butterfly
100 m men women
200 m men women
Individual medley
200 m men women
400 m men women
Freestyle relay
4×100 m men women
4×200 m men women
Medley relay
4×100 m men women

The men's 4×100 metre freestyle relay event at the 2000 Summer Olympics took place on 16 September at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre in Sydney, Australia.[1]

For the first time in 36 years, the Australians solidified their triumph in front of a raucous home crowd as they upset the undefeated Americans to capture an Olympic title in the event. Trailing by 0.60 seconds at the final relay exchange, Ian Thorpe overhauled U.S. swimmer Gary Hall, Jr. on the final stretch, and eventually touched the wall first with an anchor of 48.30 to deliver the Aussie foursome of Michael Klim (48.18), Chris Fydler (48.48), and Ashley Callus (48.74) a gold-medal time in 3:13.67. Leading off the race, Klim also established a global standard to shave 0.03 seconds off the record set by his Russian training partner Alexander Popov in 1994.[2][3] As Thorpe jumped out of the pool to congratulate his team, Klim pretended to play an air guitar to mock Hall's pre-Olympic race reference, claiming that the Americans would "smash the Aussies like guitars".[4][5]

Team USA's Hall (48.24), Carlos Jayme (49.88), Edvaldo Silva Filho (49.12) earned their first ever relay medal in 20 years, as they took home the bronze with a time of 3:17.40.[7][8]

Germany (3;17.77), Italy (3:17.85), Sweden (3:19.60), and France (3:21.00) rounded out the championship field, while the Russians, led by Popov, were disqualified due to an early relay launch from Andrey Kapralov on the lead-off leg.[8]

In the absence of Pieter van den Hoogenband on the morning prelims, the Dutch team posted an excellent time of 3:18.32 to lead the first heat, but was cast out of the final race for an early jumping attempt from Dennis Rijnbeek during the second exchange.[9]

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  United States (USA)
David Fox (49.32)
Joe Hudepohl (49.11)
Jon Olsen (48.17)
Gary Hall, Jr. (47.45)
3:15.11 Atlanta, United States 12 August 1995 [10]
Olympic record  United States (USA)
Jon Olsen (49.94)
Josh Davis (49.00)
Brad Schumacher (49.02)
Gary Hall, Jr. (47.45)
3:15.41 Atlanta, United States 23 July 1996 [10]

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
September 16 Final Michael Klim (48.18) WR
Chris Fydler (48.48)
Ashley Callus (48.71)
Ian Thorpe (48.30)
Australia 3:13.67 WR

Results

Heats

[10]

Rank Heat Lane Nation Swimmers Time Notes
1 3 4 United States Scott Tucker (49.80)
Anthony Ervin (48.43)
Jason Lezak (48.46)
Josh Davis (48.74)
3:15.43 Q
2 2 4 Australia Chris Fydler (49.72)
Todd Pearson (49.32)
Adam Pine (49.25)
Ashley Callus (49.08)
3:17.37 Q
3 1 5 Germany Lars Conrad (50.60)
Torsten Spanneberg (49.41)
Stephan Kunzelmann (49.63)
Stefan Herbst (49.06)
3:18.70 Q
4 1 3 Italy Lorenzo Vismara (49.91)
Mauro Gallo (49.92)
Klaus Lanzarini (49.60)
Simone Cercato (49.43)
3:18.86 Q
5 3 5 Brazil Fernando Scherer (50.16)
Edvaldo Silva Filho (49.26)
Carlos Jayme (50.10)
Gustavo Borges (49.77)
3:19.29 Q
6 2 5 Russia Denis Pimankov (49.93)
Leonid Khokhlov (51.02)
Andrey Kapralov (49.03)
Alexander Popov (49.72)
3:19.70 Q
7 2 6 Sweden Stefan Nystrand (50.42)
Johan Wallberg (50.30)
Lars Frölander (48.79)
Mattias Ohlin (50.29)
3:19.80 Q
8 2 3 France Romain Barnier (50.05)
Frédérick Bousquet (49.41)
Hugo Viart (50.35)
Nicolas Kintz (50.38)
3:20.19 Q
9 3 3 Great Britain Paul Belk (50.59)
Sion Brinn (49.52)
Anthony Howard (50.18)
Mark Stevens (50.16)
3:20.45
10 1 2 Belarus Igor Koleda (49.95)
Pavel Lagoun (49.80)
Dzmitry Kalinouski (51.16)
Aleh Rukhlevich (49.94)
3:20.85 NR
11 2 2 South Africa Roland Mark Schoeman (50.19)
Brendon Dedekind (50.27)
Nicholas Folker (49.57)
Terence Parkin (51.25)
3:21.28 AF
12 3 2 Ukraine Vyacheslav Shyrshov (49.77)
Rostyslav Svanidze (51.69)
Artem Goncharenko (49.98)
Pavlo Khnykin (50.04)
3:21.48
13 3 6 Canada Craig Hutchison (50.40)
Robbie Taylor (50.89)
Rick Say (50.97)
Yannick Lupien (49.72)
3:21.98
14 3 7 Israel Alexei Manziula (51.14)
Eithan Urbach (49.68)
Oren Azrad (50.68)
Yoav Bruck (50.56)
3:22.06 NR
15 1 6 Spain Jorge Luis Ulibarri (50.89)
Eduardo Lorente (50.52)
Juan Benavides (50.67)
Javier Botello (50.68)
3:22.76
16 2 7 Lithuania Arūnas Savickas (52.11)
Minvydas Packevičius (50.53)
Saulius Binevičius (50.81)
Rolandas Gimbutis (50.23)
3:23.68
17 2 8 Venezuela Carlos Santander (51.28)
Oswaldo Quevedo (51.36)
Francisco Páez (50.97)
Francisco Sánchez (51.03)
3:24.64
18 3 8 Denmark Dennis Otzen Jensen (51.69)
Henrik Steen Andersen (51.45)
Jeppe Nielsen (51.18)
Jacob Carstensen (50.46)
3:24.78
19 1 7 Croatia Duje Draganja (50.45)
Marijan Kanjer (51.37)
Ivan Mladina (50.91)
Alen Lončar (52.23)
3:24.96
20 2 1 Kyrgyzstan Sergey Ashihmin (51.65)
Konstantin Ushkov (50.04)
Dmitri Kuzmin (50.61)
Alexei Pavlov (52.73)
3:25.03
21 3 1 Kazakhstan Igor Sitnikov (52.56)
Andrey Kvassov (52.25)
Pavel Sidorov (52.14)
Sergey Borisenko (51.95)
3:28.90
022 1 1 Netherlands Mark Veens (49.38)
Dennis Rijnbeek
Ewout Holst
Johan Kenkhuis
DSQ
022 1 4 Uzbekistan Oleg Tsvetkovskiy (52.42)
Oleg Pukhnatiy
Ravil Nachaev
Petr Vasiliev
DSQ

Final

Rank Lane Nation Swimmers Time Time behind Notes
1st 5 Australia Michael Klim (48.18) WR
Chris Fydler (48.48)
Ashley Callus (48.71)
Ian Thorpe (48.30)
3:13.67 WR
2nd 4 United States Anthony Ervin (48.89)
Neil Walker (48.31)
Jason Lezak (48.42)
Gary Hall, Jr. (48.24)
3:13.86 0.19 AM
3rd 2 Brazil Fernando Scherer (49.79)
Gustavo Borges (48.61)
Carlos Jayme (49.88)
Edvaldo Silva Filho (49.12)
3:17.40 3.73
4 3 Germany Torsten Spanneberg (49.63)
Christian Tröger (49.06)
Stephan Kunzelmann (50.20)
Stefan Herbst (48.88)
3:17.77 4.10
5 6 Italy Lorenzo Vismara (49.23)
Klaus Lanzarini (49.46)
Massimiliano Rosolino (49.70)
Simone Cercato (49.46)
3:17.85 4.18
6 1 Sweden Stefan Nystrand (50.06)
Lars Frölander (48.12)
Mattias Ohlin (49.99)
Johan Nyström (51.43)
3:19.60 5.93
7 8 France Frédérick Bousquet (50.88)
Romain Barnier (49.68)
Hugo Viart (49.79)
Nicolas Kintz (50.65)
3:21.00 7.33
08 7 Russia Andrey Kapralov (50.44)
Denis Pimankov
Alexander Popov
Dmitry Chernyshov
DSQ 9.99

References

  1. ^ "Swimming schedule".  
  2. ^ Harris, Beth (16 September 2000). "Thorpe Sets World Mark, Thompson Wins 6th Gold".  
  3. ^ Longman, Jere (17 September 2000). "Sydney 2000: Swimming; Australia Aglow As Young Star Gets Two Golds".  
  4. ^ Dillman, Lisa (17 September 2000). "Gold Feat".  
  5. ^ Cowley, Michael (17 September 2000). "Klim relives the night we smashed them like guitars".  
  6. ^ "U.S. men lose relay for first time".  
  7. ^ "Five world records broken on first day of swimming".  
  8. ^ a b Whitten, Phillip (16 September 2000). "Olympic Day 1 Finals (Complete)".  
  9. ^ Whitten, Phillip (16 September 2000). "Olympic Day 1 Prelims (Complete)".  
  10. ^ a b c "Sydney 2000: Swimming – Men's 4×100m Freestyle Relay Heats" ( 

External links

  • Official Olympic Report
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