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Team software process

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Title: Team software process  
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Subject: Software development process, Personal software process, List of software development philosophies, TSP, Continuous test-driven development
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Team software process

In combination with the

  1. ^ Jones, Capers (2009). Software Engineering Best Practices. McGraw-Hill. p. 11.  
  2. ^ McAndrews, Donald (1998). "The Team Software ProcessSM (TSPSM): An Overview and Preliminary Results of Using Disciplined Practices". 
  3. ^ Humphrey, Watts. "The Team Software Process" (PDF). Software Engineering Institute. 
  4. ^ Humphrey, Watts (1999). Introduction to the Team Software Process. Addison Wesley. 
  5. ^ Humphrey, Watts. "The Team Software Process Body of Knowledge". Software Engineering Institute. 
  6. ^ Chick, Timothy. "Team Software Process (TSP) Coach Mentoring Program Guidebook Version 1.1". Software Engineering Institute. 
  7. ^ Humphrey, Watts. "The Team Software Process Body of Knowledge". Software Engineering Institute. 
  8. ^ Humphrey, Watts (2005). TSP: Coaching Development Teams. Addison Wesley. 
  9. ^ Humphrey, Watts. "The Team Software Process Body of Knowledge". Software Engineering Institute. 
  10. ^ Humphrey, Watts (2005). TSP: Coaching Development Teams. Addison Wesley. 
  11. ^ Carleton, Anita. "Extending Team Software Process (TSP) to Systems Engineering: A NAVAIR Experience Report" (PDF). Software Engineering Institute. 
  12. ^ Battle, Ed. "Leading & Learning – Using TSP at the MSG Level" (PDF). Naval Oceanographic Office. 
  13. ^ McHale, James. "http://www.sei.cmu.edu/reports/10sr032.pdf" (PDF). Software Engineering Institute. 
  14. ^ Webb, David (April 2007). "CMMI Level 5 and the Team Software Process" (PDF). Cross Talk. 
  15. ^ Mondragon, Oscar. "AIM Case Study" (PDF). Software Engineering Excellence Center. 
  16. ^ Humphrey, Watts. "The Team Software Process Body of Knowledge". Software Engineering Institute. 
  17. ^ Chick, Timothy. "Team Software Process (TSP) Coach Mentoring Program Guidebook Version 1.1". Software Engineering Institute. 

References

  • TSP homepage
  • TSP Technical Report

External links

See also

  • TSP: Leading a Development Team 2005
  • TSP: Coaching Development Teams 2005

Publications

Mapping TSP to CMMI practices has been documented,[13] and piloted as an alternative path to implement CMMI process improvement.[14][15] A body of knowledge (BOK) was issued in 2010.[16] The coach mentor program guidebook was released in 2010.[17]

TSP has been adapted to work with other types of knowledge work, including systems engineering[11] and services.[12]

Latest Developments for TSP

The coach role focuses on supporting the team and the individuals on the team as the process expert while being independent of direct project management responsibility.[7][8] The team leader role is different from the coach role in that, team leaders are responsible to management for products and project outcomes while the coach is responsible for developing individual and team performance.[9][10]

The TSP software development cycle begins with a planning process called the launch, led by a coach who has been specially trained, and is either certified or provisional.[5][6] The launch is designed to begin the team building process, and during this time teams and managers establish goals, define team roles, assess risks, estimate effort, allocate tasks, and produce a team plan. During an execution phase, developers track planned and actual effort, schedule, and defects, meeting regularly (usually weekly) to report status and revise plans. A development cycle ends with a Post Mortem to assess performance, revise planning parameters, and capture lessons learned for process improvement.

Before engineers can participate in the TSP, it is required that they have already learned about the PSP, so that the TSP can work effectively. Training is also required for other team members, the team lead, and management.

How TSP Works

Contents

  • How TSP Works 1
  • Latest Developments for TSP 2
  • Publications 3
  • See also 4
  • External links 5
  • References 6

The initial version of the TSP was developed and piloted by Watts Humphrey in the late 1990s[2] and the Technical Report[3] for TSP sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense was published in November 2000. The book by Watts Humphrey,[4] Introduction to the Team Software Process, presents a view the TSP intended for use in academic settings, that focuses on the process of building a software production team, establishing team goals, distributing team roles, and other teamwork-related activities.

The TSP is intended to improve the levels of quality and productivity of a team's software development project, in order to help them better meet the cost and schedule commitments of developing a software system. [1]

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