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Teenage pregnancy in the United States

 

Teenage pregnancy in the United States

Teenage pregnancy in the United States relates to girls under the age of 20 who get pregnant.

An anti-teenage pregnancy poster

Contents

  • Birthrate 1
  • By ethnicity 2
  • By region 3
    • Birth and abortion rates of women and girls ages 15-19, 2010 3.1
  • Parenthood 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Birthrate

Each year, almost 750,000 girls aged 15–19 become pregnant. According to Planned Parenthood two-thirds of all teen pregnancies occur among the oldest teens (18–19-year-olds).[1] Of them, 82% are unplanned, accounting for about 20% of all unintended pregnancies annually.[1] Of pregnancies among 15–19-year-olds girls in 2008, 59% ended in birth, 26% in abortion, and the rest in miscarriage.[1] In 2012, there were 104,700 maternal hospital stays for pregnant teens; the number of hospital stays for teen pregnancies decreased by 47 percent from 2000-2012.[2]

Overall, 57 pregnancies occurred per 1,000 girls aged 15–19 in 2008. In other words nearly 6% of 15–19-year-old girls became pregnant in 2008. Pregnancies are much less common among girls younger than 15. In 2008, 6.6 pregnancies occurred per 1,000 teens aged 13-14. In other words, fewer than 1% of teens younger than 15 became pregnant in 2008.[1]

Teen pregnancies—defined as pregnancies in women under the age of 20, regardless of marital status—in the United States decreased 28% between 1990 and 2000, from 117 pregnancies per every 1,000 teens to 84 per 1,000.[3] The 2008 rate was a record low and represented a 42% decline from the peak rate of 117 per 1,000, which occurred in 1990.[1] From 2009 to 2010, the teen pregnancy rate dropped 9%, the biggest one year drop since the 1940s.[4]

Teenage birth rates, as opposed to pregnancies, peaked in 1991, when there were 61.8 births per 1,000 teens, and the rate dropped in 17 of the 19 years that followed.[4] One in four American women who had sex during their teenage years will have a baby before they are married, compared to only one in ten who wait until they are older.[5] Even more will experience a pregnancy. Of women who have sex in their teens, nearly 30% will conceive a child before they are married. Conversely, only 15% of women who don't have sex in their teens will become pregnant before they are married.[5] Of all women, 16% will be teen mothers.[6]

By ethnicity

Black and Hispanic women have the highest teen pregnancy rates (117 and 107 per 1,000 women aged 15–19, respectively). Studies show that whites (43 per 1,000)[1] and Asians (23 per 1,000)[6] have the lowest rate of pregnancy before the age of 20. The pregnancy rate among black teens decreased 48% between 1990 and 2008, more than the overall U.S. teen pregnancy rate declined during the same period (42%).[1] Slightly more than half of Hispanic and black women will become pregnant before the age of 20.[6] Declines in birth rates between 2007 and 2011 were steepest for Hispanic teenagers, averaging 34% for the United States, followed by declines of 24% for non-Hispanic black teenagers and 20% for non-Hispanic white teenagers. Rates in Arizona and Utah declined the most during that period.[7]

By region

Statistics also vary regionally. In 2008, New Mexico had the highest teenage pregnancy rate (93 per 1,000); rates in Mississippi, Texas, Nevada and Arkansas followed. The lowest rates were in New Hampshire (33 per 1,000), followed by Vermont, Minnesota, North Dakota and Massachusetts.[1] In New England, most states had less than 20 births per 1,000 girls.[8]

International comparisons typically place US teen pregnancy and teen birth rates among the highest in the developed world. For example, a 2001 study by UNICEF found that the US teenage birth rate was the highest among 28 OECD nations in the review;[9] in a 1999 comparison by the

External links

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^ a b
  6. ^ a b c
  7. ^ Hamilton, Brady E. et al. (2013). Declines in State Teen Birth Rates by Race and Hispanic Origin. Hyattsville, Md.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics.
  8. ^
  9. ^ UNICEF. (2001). A League Table of Teenage Births in Rich Nations PDF (888 KB). Retrieved July 7, 2006.
  10. ^ Indicator: Births per 1000 women (15–19 ys) – 2002 UNFPA, State of World Population 2003. Retrieved January 22, 2007.
  11. ^
  12. ^

References

See also


Most female teens report that they would be very upset (58%) or a little upset (29%) if they got pregnant, while the remaining 13% report that they would be a little or very pleased.[1] Most male teens report that they would be very upset (47%) or a little upset (34%) if they got someone pregnant, while the remaining 18% report that they would be a little or very pleased.[1]

For every 1,000 black boys in the United States, 29 of them are fathers, compared to 14 per 1,000 white boys.[1] The rate of teen fatherhood declined 36% between 1991 and 2010, from 25 to 16 per 1,000 males aged 15–19. This decline was more substantial among blacks than among whites (50% vs. 26%) and about half of the rate among teen girls.[1]

Most of these were first births; 18% were the second or higher child.[1] Eighty-nine percent of the girls are unmarried at the time they gave birth.[1] In 1972, 52% of all mothers who gave birth while unmarried were teenagers; in 2011 they made up just 18%.[1]

There were 334,000 births among girls aged 19 or younger in 2011, representing 8% of all U.S. births.[1] Births to teen mothers peaked in 1991 at 62 births per 1,000 girls. This rate was halved by 2011 when there were 31 births per 1,000 girls.[1]

Parenthood

[14]
US State Pregnancy rate Birthrate Abortion rate % aborted
Alabama 62 44 9 17
Alaska 64 38 17 30
Arizona 60 42 9 18
Arkansas 73 53 9 14
California 59 32 19 38
Colorado 50 30 10 20
Connecticut 44 19 20 52
Delaware 67 31 28 47
Washington, D.C. 90 45 32 41
Florida 60 32 19 38
Georgia 64 42 13 24
Hawaii 65 33 23 42
Idaho 47 33 7 17
Illinois 57 33 15 32
Indiana 53 38 7 16
Iowa 44 29 9 23
Kansas 53 39 5 12
Kentucky 62 46 6 12
Louisiana 69 48 10 18
Maine 37 22 10 31
Maryland 57 27 22 45
Massachusetts 37 17 14 46
Michigan 52 30 14 32
Minnesota 36 23 8 25
Mississippi 76 55 9 14
Missouri 54 37 9 19
Montana 53 35 10 21
Nebraska 43 31 5 14
Nevada 68 39 20 34
New Hampshire 28 16 8 35
New Jersey 51 20 24 55
New Mexico 80 53 15 22
New York 63 23 32 58
North Carolina 59 38 12 24
North Dakota 42 29 6 18
Ohio 54 34 12 25
Oklahoma 69 50 8 13
Oregon 47 28 12 29
Pennsylvania 49 27 15 35
Rhode Island 44 22 16 41
South Carolina 65 43 13 23
South Dakota 47 35 4 11
Tennessee 62 43 9 18
Texas 73 52 9 15
Utah 38 28 4 13
Vermont 32 18 9 34
Virginia 48 27 14 33
Washington 49 27 16 37
West Virginia 64 45 9 17
Wisconsin 39 26 7 21
Wyoming 56 39 8 17

Birth and abortion rates of women and girls ages 15-19, 2010

Despite having declined, the U.S. teen pregnancy rate continues to be one of the highest in the developed world. It is more than twice as high as rates in Canada (28 per 1,000 women aged 15–19 in 2006) and Sweden (31 per 1,000).[1]

Sexually active teens in the US are less likely to use any contraceptive method Condoms and especially less likely to use highly effective hormonal methods, primarily the pill, than their peers in other countries. The research also found that US teens who become pregnant are less likely to choose abortion, whether due to lack of access, higher levels of antiabortion sentiment, or greater acceptance of teen motherhood.[13]

[12]

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