(18801) Noelleoas

(18801) Noelleoas
Caractéristiques orbitales
Époque 27 juin 2015 (JJ 2457200,5)[1]
Demi-grand axe (a) 356,047×106 km[1]
(2,38 ua)
Périhélie (q) 303,688×106 km[1]
(2,03 ua)
Aphélie (Q) 406,911×106 km[1]
(2,72 ua)
Excentricité (e) 0,14[1]
Période de révolution (Prév) ~1 337 j
(3,66 a)
Inclinaison (i) 6,9°[1]
Nœud ascendant (Ω) 125,7°[1]
Argument du périhélie (ω) 163,6°[1]
Anomalie moyenne (M0) 105,8°[1]
Catégorie Astéroïde de la ceinture principale[1],[2]
Caractéristiques physiques
Magnitude absolue (M) 14,2[1],[2]
Découverte
Découvreur LINEAR[1],[2]
Date le 10 mai 1999[1],[2]
Lieu Socorro (Nouveau-Mexique)[1]
Désignation 1999 JO76[1],[2]

(18801) Noelleoas est un astéroïde de la ceinture principale d'astéroïdes.

Sommaire

Description

(18801) Noelleoas est un astéroïde[1] de la ceinture principale d'astéroïdes. Il fut découvert le 10 mai 1999 à Socorro (Nouveau-Mexique) par le projet LINEAR. Il présente une orbite caractérisée par un demi-grand axe de 2,38 UA, une excentricité de 0,14 et une inclinaison de 6,9° par rapport à l'écliptique[2].

Compléments

Articles connexes

Références

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p (en) »(18801) Noelleoas = 1999 JO76« , sur le site du Minor Planet Center (consulté le 17 octobre 2015)
  2. ^ a b c d e f (en) »18801 Noelleoas (1999 JO76)« [html], sur ssd.jpl.nasa.gov, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (consulté le 17 octobre 2015)

34% more Americans killed in Iraq during past 12 months than in previous 12 months

Tuesday, July 5, 2005

According to USA Today report, U.S. Defense department numbers show that 882 U.S. troops died in the 12 months through June 30th, 2005. This is a 34.2% increase from 657 killed in the preceding 12 months.

This figure does not include those troops who died during transportation out of Iraq.

These figures come amidst rising concerns among American citizens, reflected by poll numbers, and their release by the Defense department is contemporaneous with Bush's recent speech rallying the war.

Sources

  • Rick Jervis. "Pace of troop deaths up in Iraq" — USA Today, July 5, 2005


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