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Texas's 17th congressional district

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Texas's 17th congressional district

Texas's 17th congressional district
Texas's 17th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Texas's 17th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Bill Flores (RBryan)
Population (2000) 651,619
Median income $35,253
Ethnicity 78.6% White, 10.4% Black, 1.5% Asian, 15.4% Hispanic, 0.5% Native American, 0.3% other
Cook PVI R+12 (2012)

Texas District 17 of the Crawford, known as Prairie Chapel Ranch.[1][2] The district is currently represented by Republican Bill Flores. The 2012 redistricting removed the northern portions of the district, with Waco now serving as its northern border.

The district includes two large colleges, Baylor University in Waco and Texas A&M University in College Station; both universities are known for being conservative.

Representation

Along with MS-4, TX-17 was the most heavily Republican district in the nation represented by a Democrat, according to the Cook Partisan Voting Index, which rates it R+20.[3] This is due to the 2003 Texas redistricting, engineered by former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay. The district was drawn to make it Republican-dominated and unseat its then Democratic incumbent, Chet Edwards. Ultimately, this failed, and while several of his colleagues went down to defeat, Edwards held on to the seat in the 2004, 2006 and 2008 elections.

However, In the 2010 Congressional elections, the district elected Republican Bill Flores over Edwards by a margin of 61.8% to 36.6%.[4] Flores, who took office on January 3, 2011, is the first Republican ever elected to represent this district since its creation 91 years ago.

List of representatives

Representative Party Years District home Note
District created March 4, 1919
Thomas L. Blanton Democratic March 4, 1919 - March 3, 1929 Abilene Redistricted from the 16th district
Robert Q. Lee Democratic March 4, 1929 - April 18, 1930 Cisco Died
Vacant April 18, 1930 – May 20, 1930
Thomas L. Blanton Democratic May 20, 1930 - January 3, 1937 Abilene
Clyde L. Garrett Democratic January 3, 1937 - January 3, 1941 Eastland
Sam M. Russell Democratic January 3, 1941 - January 3, 1947 Stephenville
Omar Burleson Democratic January 3, 1947 - December 31, 1978 Anson Resigned
Vacant December 31, 1978 – January 3, 1979
Charles Stenholm Democratic January 3, 1979 - January 3, 2005 Abilene Redistricted to the 19th district; Lost Reelection
Chet Edwards Democratic January 3, 2005 – January 3, 2011 Waco Redistricted from the 11th district; Lost Reelection
Bill Flores Republican January 3, 2011 - Bryan Incumbent

Election results

US House election, 2012: Texas District 17
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Bill Flores 143,284[5] 79.93 +34.8
Libertarian Ben Easton 35,978 20.07 119
Majority 107,306
Turnout 179,262 4.23
US House election, 2010: Texas District 17
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Bill Flores 106,275 61.79 +16.28
Democratic Chet Edwards 62,926 36.59 -16.39
Libertarian Richard Kelly 2,787 1.62 +0.11
Majority 43,349 25.2 +17.73
Turnout 171,988
Republican gain from Democratic Swing +16.34
US House election, 2008: Texas District 17
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chet Edwards 134,592 52.98 -5.14
Republican Rob Curnock 115,581 45.51 +5.21
Libertarian Gardner C. Osbourne 3,849 1.51 -0.07
Majority 19,011 7.47 -10.35
Turnout 254,022
Democratic hold Swing -5.18
US House election, 2006: Texas District 17
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chet Edwards 92,478 58.12 +6.92
Republican Van Taylor 64,142 40.30 -7.11
Libertarian Guillermo Acosta 2,504 1.58 +0.19
Majority 28,336 17.82 +14.03
Turnout 159,124
Democratic hold Swing +7.02
US House election, 2004: Texas District 17
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chet Edwards 125,309 51.20 -0.17
Republican Arlene Wohlgemuth 116,049 47.41 +0.03
Libertarian Clyde Garland 3,390 1.39 +0.14
Majority 9,260 3.79 -0.19
Turnout 244,748
Democratic hold Swing -0.1
US House election, 2002: Texas District 17
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Charlie Stenholm 84,136 51.37
Republican Rob Beckham 77,622 47.38
Libertarian Fred Jones 2,046 1.25
Majority 6,514 3.98
Turnout 163,804
Democratic hold Swing

Historical district boundaries

2007 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ "Pelosi continues to tout Texas Rep. Chet Edwards for VP". Texas on the Potomac (blog).  
  2. ^ Vlahos, Kelley (2006-03-07). "Texas Rep. Edwards Beats Odds, but Faces Iraq War Vet in Midterm". Fox News. Retrieved 2007-03-25. 
  3. ^ Texas 17th District Profile Congressional Quarterly. May 14, 2010.
  4. ^ 2010 Texas Election Results New York Times. November 13, 2010.
  5. ^ United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2012#District 17
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

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