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Third Street (San Francisco)

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Title: Third Street (San Francisco)  
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Third Street (San Francisco)

Third Street, formerly Kentucky Street in the Dogpatch and Railroad Avenue in the Bayview, is a north-south street running through the Downtown, Mission Bay, Potrero Point, Dogpatch, and the Bayview-Hunters Point neighborhood in San Francisco, California which turns into Kearny Street north of Market Street and turns into Bayshore Boulevard south of Geneva Avenue.[1] Major League Baseball's San Francisco Giants play at AT&T Park on the intersection Third and King.

The majority of the street is served by the T Third Street light rail line.[2][3][4]

In 2009, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom proposed Third Street be renamed for former mayor Willie Brown.[5]

The street has featured as a filming location in numerous films, perhaps the most notable scene being in the James Bond film A View to a Kill (1985) where Bond (played for the last time by Roger Moore) escaped from police wrongly suspecting him of murder in a fire engine driven by Stacey Sutton (Tanya Roberts) and cut himself off from pursuing patrol cars by jumping over the rising Lefty O'Doul Drawbridge.[1]

References

  1. ^ Exact location of 3rd Street
  2. ^ SAN FRANCISCO / Third Street seeing streetcars / Test runs for light-rail project begin at last
  3. ^ 3rd St. rail line goes full-time on Saturday
  4. ^ MUNI 3rd Street Light Rail
  5. ^ [2]


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