Timeline of Lübeck history

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

Part of a series on the
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Prior to 13th century

13th–15th centuries

16th–18th centuries

19th century

  • 1801 – Town "temporarily occupied" by Danes.[1]
  • 1802 – Town walls dismantled.[6]
  • 1806 – 5 November: Town occupied by French forces.[3]
  • 1810 – 12 November: Town becomes part of the French Empire.[4]
  • 1813 – French occupation ends.
  • 1825 – Navigation School founded.[12]
  • 1832 – Lübecker General-Anzeiger newspaper begins publication.
  • 1835 – Neue Lübeckische Blätter in publication.
  • 1851 – Population: city 26,093; territory 54,166.[2]
  • 1866 – Lübeck becomes part of the North German Confederation.[6]
  • 1867 – Wilhelm-Theater opens.[15]
  • 1868
  • 1874 – Aegidien-Kirche (church) restored.[8]
  • 1875 – Population: 44,799.[6]
  • 1890 – Population: town 63,590; territory 76,485.[6]
  • 1891 – Sacred Heart Church consecrated.
  • 1893 – Museum am Dom built.

20th century

21st century

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Lübeck", Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.), New York, 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  2. ^ a b Charles Knight, ed. (1866). "Lübeck". Geography. English Cyclopaedia 3. London: Bradbury, Evans, & Co. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Joseph Lins (1913). "Lübeck". Catholic Encyclopedia. NY. 
  4. ^ a b c George Henry Townsend (1867), "Lübeck", A Manual of Dates (2nd ed.), London: Frederick Warne & Co. 
  5. ^ ]Architecture and monuments of the Hanseatic City of Lübeck [Bau- und Kunstdenkmäler der Freien und Hansestadt Lübeck (in German) 2 (1). Lübeck: Bernhard Nöhring. 1906. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Lübeck". Chambers's Encyclopaedia. London. 1901. 
  7. ^ ]Architecture and monuments of the Hanseatic City of Lübeck [Bau- und Kunstdenkmäler der Freien und Hansestadt Lübeck (in German) 2 (2). Lübeck: Bernhard Nöhring. 1906. 
  8. ^ a b c d e "Lübeck". Handbook for North Germany. London: J. Murray. 1877. 
  9. ^ a b Eckehard Simon (1993). "Organizing and Staging Carnival Plays in Late Medieval Lübeck: A New Look at the Archival Record". Journal of English and Germanic Philology 92. JSTOR 27710764. 
  10. ^ Rhiman A. Rotz (1977). "The Lübeck Uprising of 1408 and the Decline of the Hanseatic League". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 121. JSTOR 986565. 
  11. ^ Elina Gertsman (2003). "The Dance of Death in Reval (Tallinn)". Gesta 42. JSTOR 25067083. 
  12. ^ a b c Max Hoffmann (1908). Chronik der Stadt Lübeck (in German). Lübcke & Nöring. 
  13. ^ George Grove, ed. (1879). A Dictionary of Music and Musicians 1. London: Macmillan. 
  14. ^ a b "Lübeck's Spires, a Quick Hop From Hamburg". New York Times. 5 August 2011. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "Lübeck". Neuer Theater-Almanach (in German). Berlin: F.A. Günther & Sohn. 1908. 
  16. ^ "Global Resources Network". Chicago, USA: Center for Research Libraries. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 

This article incorporates information from the German WorldHeritage.

Further reading

  • "Lübeck". Topographia Saxoniae Inferioris. Topographia Germaniae (in German). Frankfurt. 1653. p. 154+. 
  • Thomas Nugent (1749), "Lübeck", The Grand Tour, 2: Germany and Holland, London: S. Birt 

Published in the 19th century

  • "Lübeck", Leigh's New Descriptive Road Book of Germany, London: Leigh and Son, 1837 
  • Robert Baird (1842), "Lübeck", Visit to Northern Europe, New York: John S. Taylor & Co., OCLC 8052123 
German-language
  • Ernst Deecke (1881), Die freie und Hanse-Stadt Lübeck (in German) (4th ed.) 
  • Ernst Deecke (1891), Lübische Geschichten und Sagen (in German) 
  • Max Hoffmann (1889–1892). Geschichte der Freien und Hansestadt Lübeck (in German). 

Published in the 20th century

  • "Lübeck", Northern Germany (15th ed.), Leipzig: Karl Baedeker, 1910, OCLC 78390379 
  • Wilson King (1914), Chronicles of Three Free Cities: Hamburg Bremen, Lübeck, London: Dent 
German-language
  • ]Chronicles of the German Cities [Lübeck. Die Chroniken der Deutschen Städte (in German). 19, 26, 28, 30-31. Leipzig: S. Hirzel. 1884–1911. 

External links

  • Europeana. Items related to Lübeck, various dates.
  • Digital Public Library of America. Items related to Lübeck, various dates

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