Timeline of Sarajevo history

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Prior to 15th century

15th-18th centuries

  • 1697 - September: City sacked by Austrian forces.[2]
  • 1730 - Serbian Orthodox church rebuilt.[2]
  • 1739 - Fortress restored.[2]
  • 1766 - Magribija rebuilt.[2]
  • 1788 - Fire.[2]
  • 1791 - November: Flood.
  • 1797 - Fire.[2]

19th century

  • 1813 - Plague.[2]
  • 1851 - Population: 21,102.[2]
  • 1869 - Orphanage founded.[3]
  • 1879 - Fire.[2]
  • 1885 - Population: 26,377.[2]
  • 1895 - Population: 37,713.[3]
  • 1896 - Town Hall[4] and National Library built.[5]

20th century

  • 1910 - Population: 51,919.[2]
  • 1912 - Kino Apolo (cinema) opens.[6]
  • 1913 - National Museum built.[4]
  • 1915 - Kino Imperijal (cinema) opens.[6]
  • 1921 - Population: 60,087.[2]
  • 1930 - Art gallery established.[4]
  • 1935 - Kino Tesla (cinema) opens.[6]
  • 1941 - German occupation begins.[8]
  • 1945
    • April: German occupation ends.[8]
    • State School of Painting, and Association of Artists of Bosnia and Herzegovina established.[4]
  • 1961 - Population: 213,092.[2]
  • 1962 - June: Earthquake.[10]
  • 1971 - 359,448 metro.
  • 1972 - Academy of Arts opens.[4]
  • 1977 - Faculty of Islamic Theology established.[2]
  • 1991 - Population: 361,735; canton 527,049.

21st century

  • 2002 - Population: 401,118.[13]
  • 2013
    • Ivo Komšić becomes mayor.
    • Population: 369,534; metro 515,012.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Amira Dzirolo and Paul E. Schellinger (1996). "Sarajevo". In Trudy Ring. Southern Europe. International Dictionary of Historic Places 3. Fitzroy Dearborn. OCLC 31045650. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q A. Popovic (2007). "Sarajevo". In C. Edmund Bosworth. Historic Cities of the Islamic World. Leiden: Koninklijke Brill. pp. 164–171. ISBN . 
  3. ^ a b c "Serajevo", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Bosnia and Herzegovina". Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art & Architecture. Oxford University Press. 2009. ISBN . 
  5. ^ ArchNet.org. "Sarajevo". Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: MIT School of Architecture and Planning. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c "Movie Theaters in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  7. ^ Stephen Pope; Elizabeth-Anne Wheal (1995). "Select Chronology". Dictionary of the First World War. Macmillan. ISBN . 
  8. ^ a b "Sarajevo", Webster's Geographical Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, USA: G. & C. Merriam Co., 1960, p. 1008, OL 5812502M 
  9. ^ "Sarajevo (Bosnia and Hercegovina) Newspapers". WorldCat. USA: Online Computer Library Center. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  10. ^ "Quake Shakes Sarajevo; 7 in Yugoslav City Hurt", New York Times, 12 June 1962 
  11. ^ Riedlmayer, András (July 1995). "Erasing the Past: The Destruction of Libraries and Archives in Bosnia - Herzegovina". Middle East Studies Association: Bulletin (Middle East Studies Association of North America). Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  12. ^ "Members". Global Investigative Journalism Network. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  13. ^ Fran Markowitz (2007). "Census and Sensibilities in Sarajevo". Comparative Studies in Society and History 49. JSTOR 4497682. 

This article incorporates information from the German WorldHeritage and Serbian WorldHeritage.

Further reading

Published in the 19th century

  • Charles Knight, ed. (1866). "Bosna-Serai". Geography. English Cyclopaedia 2. London: Bradbury, Evans, & Co. 

Published in the 20th century

  • Robert Munro (1900), "To and at Sarajevo", Rambles and studies in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Dalmatia (2nd ed.), Edinburgh: W. Blackwood 
  • F.K. Hutchinson (1909). "(Sarajevo)". Motoring in the Balkans. Chicago: McClurg & Co. OCLC 8647011. 
  • "Sarajevo". Austria-Hungary (11th ed.). Leipzig: Karl Baedeker. 1911. 
  • Vladislav Skaric (1928). Serbian Orthodox Church and the people of Sarajevo in the 17th and 18th century. Sarajevo.  (Published in Serbian?)
  • Vladislav Skaric (1937). Sarajevo and its surroundings from the earliest times to the Austro-Hungarian occupation. Sarajevo.  (Published in Serbian?)
  • Mula Mustafa Bašeskija (1987). Ljetopis (1746-1804) (in Croatian). Sarajevo: Veselin Masleša. ISBN .  (Sarajevo in the 18th century by contemporary Mulla Mustafa Basheski)
  • John F. Burns (26 July 1992). "The Dying City of Sarajevo". New York Times. Photographs by Jon Jones. 
  • Chris Hedges (28 July 1995). "War Turns Sarajevo Away From Europe". New York Times. 
  • D. Juzbasic, ed. (1997), Papers on History of Sarajevo, Sarajevo: Institute for History/Institute for Oriental Studies 

External links

  • Europeana. Items related to Sarajevo, various dates.

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