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Timeline of the Hebrew prophets

 

Timeline of the Hebrew prophets

This is a timeline of the development of prophecy among the Jews in Judaism. All dates are given according to the Common Era, not the Hebrew calendar.

See also Jewish history which includes links to individual country histories.

Contents

  • the Exodus 1
  • the Land of Israel 2
  • During the Kingdom of Israel and Judah 3
  • During Exile 4
  • Post Exile 5
  • References 6

the Exodus

c. 1312 BC(?*)
the Exodus from Egypt (Moses)

the Land of Israel

c. 1250 BC
Joshua leads the people
c. 1150 BC–c. 1025 BC
Biblical Judges lead the people

During the Kingdom of Israel and Judah

c. 1025 BC–c. 1007 BC
King Saul, prophecy of Samuel
c. 1010 BC–c. 970 BC
King David, prophecy of Nathan
c. 1001 BCE–c. 931 BC
King Solomon
c. 931 BC–c. 913 BC
King Rehoboam of Judah
c. 931 BC–c. 910 BC
King Jeroboam of Israel, prophecy of Ahijah
c. 911 BC–c. 910 BC
King Asa of Judah

prophecies of Jehu, Elijah, Micaiah, and Elisha

c. 837 BC–c. 800 BC
King Joash of Judah

prophecy of Joel

c. 796 BC–c. 768 BC
King Joash of Judah

prophecy of Amos, Hosea

c. 767 BC–c. 754 BC
King Uzziah of Judah

prophecy of Micah

c. 740 BC–c. 700 BC
prophesy of Isaiah
c. 740 BC–c. 722 BC
Kingdom of Israel falls to Neo-Assyrian Empire
c. 715 BC–c. 687 BC
King Hezekiah of Judah

prophecy of Nahum

During Exile

c. 597 BC–c. 520 BC

prophecy of Jonah[1] during the time of Babylonian captivity, though dating of the book ranges from the 6th to the late 3rd century BC.

At Judea

prophecy of Zephaniah, Jeremiah, Habakuk

At Babylon

prophecy of Ezekiel

Post Exile

c. 520 BC–c. 411 BC
prophecy of Haggiah, Zechariah

Return to the land under Persian rule, and writings of Ezra-Nehemiah

Story of Esther

c. 433 BC [?]
prophecy of Malachi during the times of the Persian Empire
c. 160 BC
"prophecy" of Daniel during the time of the Seleucid dynasty. Note that in Jewish scripture, Daniel is not considered a prophet and is not included among the prophetic books.[2]

References

  1. ^ Anthony R. Ceresko, "Jonah" in New Jerome Biblical Commentary Ed. Raymond E. Brown, Joseph A. Fitzmeyer, and Roland E. Murphy. Prentice Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1996. pp. 580-584.
  2. ^ Louis F. Hartman and Alexander A. Di Lella, "Daniel" in New Jerome Biblical Commentary Ed. Raymond E. Brown, Joseph A. Fitzmeyer, and Roland E. Murphy. Prentice Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1996. pp. 406-420.
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