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Tragulus

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Subject: Vietnam mouse-deer, Greater mouse-deer, Java mouse-deer, Philippine mouse-deer, Williamson's mouse-deer
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Tragulus

Tragulus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Tragulidae
Genus: Tragulus
Brisson, 1762

Tragulus is a genus of even-toed ungulates in the Tragulidae family that are known as mouse-deer.[1] Tragos refers to a goat in Greek, while –ulus in Latin means 'tiny'. With a weight of 0.7–8.0 kg (1.5–17.6 lb) and a length of 40–75 cm (16–30 in), they are the smallest ungulates in the world, though the largest species of mouse-deer surpass some species of Neotragus antelopes in size.[2] The mouse-deer are restricted to Southeast Asia from far southern China (south Yunnan) to the Philippines (Balabac) and Java.[2] Following recent taxonomic changes, several of the species in this genus are poorly known, but all are believed to be mainly nocturnal and feed on leaves, fruits, grasses, and other vegetation in the dense forest undergrowth.[2] They are solitary or live in pairs, and the males have elongated canine teeth (neither gender has horns) that are used in fights.[2] Unlike other members of their family, the Tragulus mouse-deer lack obvious pale stripes/spots on their upper parts.[2]

Taxonomy

Traditionally, only two species of mouse-deer in the genus Tragulus have been recognized: The relatively large T. napu and the small T. javanicus. Following a review in 2004, T. nigricans and T. versicolor were split from T. napu, and T. kanchil and T. williamsoni was split from T. javanicus.[3] With these changes, T. kanchil and T. napu are the most widespread species, while the remaining have far smaller distributions (though some uncertainty over the exact distribution limits of the various species in Indochina remain).[3]

References

  1. ^ Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M., eds. (2005). Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press.  
  2. ^ a b c d e Nowak, R. M. (eds) (1999). Walker's Mammals of the World. 6th edition. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  3. ^ a b Meijaard, I., and C. P. Groves (2004). A taxonomic revision of the Tragulus mouse-deer. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 140: 63-102.


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