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Transfer is a technique used in nation, patriotism, etc.) to another in order to make the second more acceptable or to discredit it. It evokes an emotional response, which stimulates the target to identify with recognized authorities. Often highly visual, this technique often utilizes symbols (for example, the Swastika used in Nazi Germany, originally a symbol for health and prosperity) superimposed over other visual images. An example of common use of this technique in the United States is for the President to be filmed or photographed in front of the country's flag.[1] Another technique used is celebrity endorsement.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "[Symbols] are constantly used. The cross represents the Christian Church. The flag represents the nation. Cartoons like Uncle Sam represent a consensus of public opinion. Those symbols stir emotions." — Institute for Propaganda Analysis. Transfer originally identified in 1938 by the IPA as one of the seven classifications of propaganda. In other words, transfer fantasy causes people to want to be as gorgeous as the model in the ad or as good as a basketball play in the commercial. So, it makes you want to buy the product to be just like the person in the ad. [1]
  2. ^ "Building Brand Image Through Event Sponsorship: The Role of Image Transfer.". AllBusiness.com. Retrieved 2010-03-22. 
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