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Turkish Stream

Turkish Stream
Map of Turkish Stream
Location
Country Russian Federation
Turkey
From Ruskaya compressor station
Passes through Black Sea
To undecided
General information
Type natural gas
Partners Gazprom
Technical information
Maximum discharge 63×10^9 m3/a (2.2×10^12 cu ft/a)

The Turkish Stream is a working name of the proposed natural gas pipeline from the Russian Federation to Turkey across the Black Sea. The proposal was announced by Russian president Vladimir Putin on 1 December 2014, during his state visit to Turkey. The proposed pipeline should replace the cancelled South Stream project.[1][2] According to Gazprom, the project does not have an official name yet.[3]

The pipeline would start at the Russkaya compressor station near Anapa. In February 2015, Gazprom chief Alexei Miller and Turkish Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Taner Yildiz announced that the landing point in Turkey would be Kıyıköy, a village in the district of Vize in Kırklareli Province at northwestern Turkey.[4] According to Gazprom, pipe-laying works will start immediately when the landing point in Turkey is decided.[3] Two pipe-laying ships are already located in the Black Sea.[5]

The planned capacity of the pipeline is 63 billion cubic metres per annum (2.2 trillion cubic feet per annum) of natural gas.[3] Turkey would take about 14 billion cubic metres per annum (490 billion cubic feet per annum), the rest of the gas is planned to be exported to Europe.[5] However, there are concerns that there is not enough capacity to transport this amount from the Greek-Turkish border further to Europe.[6] According to the European Commissioner for Energy Maroš Šefčovič the proposed pipeline exceeds demands of possible customers.[7]

Negotiations between Russia and Turkey have not been finalized.[8]

The first direct gas pipeline between Russia and Turkey was the Blue Stream, commissioned in 2005. The expansion plan was replaced later by the South Stream. In 2009, Putin proposed a line parallel to Blue Stream 1 under the Black Sea, from Samsun to Ceyhan, and further to Syria, Lebanon, Israel, and Cyprus.[9]

References

  1. ^ "Putin:Russia Cannot Continue South Stream Construction in Current Situation".  
  2. ^ "Russia drops South Stream gas pipeline plan".  
  3. ^ a b c "Launch date of Turkish Stream not to differ much from South Stream schedule - Gazprom".  
  4. ^ "Gazprom agrees on 180-km land section of Turkish Stream gas pipeline between Kiyikoy, Epsila". Interfax. Retrieved 22 June 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Paul, Amanda (2015-01-24). "'"Game on for 'Turkish Stream.  
  6. ^ Panin, Alexander (2015-01-21). "Russia's New Turkish Stream Gas Strategy More Bark Than Bite".  
  7. ^ Panin, Alexander (2015-01-23). "EU Energy Chief Says Russia's Turkish Stream Gas Project Won't Work".  
  8. ^ Reed, Stanley; Arsu, Sebnem (21 January 2015). "Russia Presses Ahead With Plan for Gas Pipeline to Turkey". New York Times. Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  9. ^  
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