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United Nations Millennium Declaration

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Title: United Nations Millennium Declaration  
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Subject: Sustainable development, Millennium Summit, Olympic truce, Sustainability, 2005 World Summit
Collection: United Nations General Assembly Resolutions
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United Nations Millennium Declaration

United Nations Millennium Declaration
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Signed 8 September 2000
United Nations Millennium Declaration at Wikisource

On 8 September 2000, following a three day Millennium Summit of world leaders at the headquarters of the United Nations, the General Assembly adopted the Millennium Declaration.[1] A follow-up outcome of the resolution was passed by the General Assembly on 14 December 2000 to guide its implementation.[1] Progress on implementation of the Declaration was reviewed at the 2005 World Summit of leaders.

Contents

  • Chapters 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Chapters

The Millennium Declaration has eight chapters and key objectives, adopted by 189 world leaders during the summit: The Declaration, after the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, stresses the observance of international human rights law and international humanitarian law under the Principles of United Nations Charter as well as the treaties on sustainable development. The Declaration also urges observance of the Olympic truce individually and collectively.[1]

  1. Values and Principles
  • Freedom
  • Equality
  • Solidarity
  • Tolerance
  • Respect for nature - "Shown in the management of all living species and natural resources, in accordance with the precepts of sustainable development."
  • Shared responsibility
  1. Peace, Security and Disarmament
  2. Development and Poverty Eradication
  3. Protecting our Common Environment
  4. Human Rights, Democracy and Good Governance
  5. Protecting the Vulnerable
  6. Meeting the Special Needs of Africa
  7. Strengthening the United Nations

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c The General Assembly (September 8, 2000). "United Nations Millennium Declaration". United Nations. Retrieved April 9, 2014. 

External links

  • United Nations Millennium Declaration
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