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United States House of Representatives, Maryland District 8

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Title: United States House of Representatives, Maryland District 8  
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United States House of Representatives, Maryland District 8

"MD-8" redirects here. For the state route, see Maryland Route 8.
Maryland's 8th congressional district
Current Representative Chris Van Hollen (DKensington)
Cook PVI D+10[1]

Maryland's 8th congressional district stretches from the northern Washington, D.C. suburbs north towards the Pennsylvania border. The district is currently represented by Democrat Chris Van Hollen.


History

The district was created after the 1790 census in time for the 1792 election, was abolished after the 1830 census, and was reinstated after the 1960 census. During Carlton R. Sickles's tenure, the district was at-large and covered the entire state.

During redistricting after the 2000 census, the Democratic-dominated Maryland legislature sought to unseat then-incumbent Republican Connie Morella. One proposal went so far as to divide the district in two, effectively giving one to state Senator Christopher Van Hollen, Jr. and forcing then-incumbent Connie Morella to run against popular Maryland State Delegate and Kennedy political family member Mark Kennedy Shriver. The final redistricting plan was less ambitious, restoring an eastern, heavily Democratic spur of Montgomery County removed in the 1990 redistricting to the 8th District, as well as adding an adjacent portion from heavily Democratic Prince George's County located in Maryland's 5th congressional district. Although it forced Van Hollen and Shriver to run against each other in an expensive primary, the shift pushed the district into the Democratic column, and Van Hollen defeated Morella in 2002.

From 2003 to 2013 the district mostly consisted of the larger part of Montgomery County, also including a small portion of Prince George's County.

Recent elections

Marylands's 8th congressional district election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Connie Morella (inc.) 156,241 52.00%
Democratic Terry Lierman 136,840 45.54%
Constitution Brian D. Saunders 7,017 2.34%
Write-ins 371 0.12%
Totals 300,469 100.00%
Republican hold
Marylands's 8th congressional district election, 2002
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic Chris Van Hollen 112,788 51.74%
Republican Connie Morella (inc.) 103,587 47.52%
Write-ins 1,599 0.73%
Totals 217,974 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican
Marylands's 8th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chris Van Hollen (inc.) 215,129 74.91% +23.17
Republican Chuck Floyd 71,989 25.07% -22.45
Write-ins 79 0.03% -0.70
Totals 287,197 100.00%
Democratic hold
Marylands's 8th congressional district election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chris Van Hollen (inc.) 168,872 76.52% +1.61
Republican Jeffrey M. Stein 48,324 21.90% -3.17
Green Gerard P. Giblin 3,298 1.49% +1.49
Write-ins 191 0.09% +0.09
Totals 220,685 100.00%
Democratic hold Swing }
Maryland's 8th Congressional District: 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chris Van Hollen (inc.) 229,740 75.08% -1.44
Republican Steve Hudson 66,351 21.68% -0.22
Green Gordon Clark 6,828 2.23% +0.74
Libertarian Ian Thomas 2,562 0.84% +0.84
Write-in All write-ins 533 0.17% +0.08
Totals 306,014 100.00%
Democratic hold Swing
Maryland's 8th Congressional District: 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chris Van Hollen (inc.) 153,613 73.27% -1.81
Republican Michael Lee Philips 52,421 25.00% +3.32
Libertarian Mark Grannis 2,713 1.29% +0.45
Constitution Fred Nordhorn 696 0.33% +0.33
No party Write-ins 224 0.11%
Total votes 209,667 100.00%
Democratic hold
Maryland's 8th Congressional District: 2012[2]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic Chris Van Hollen (inc.) 217,531 63.4%
Republican Ken Timmerman 113,033 32.9%
Libertarian Mark Grannis 7,235 2.1%
Green George Gluck 5,064 1.5%
N/A Others (write-in) 393 0.1%
Totals 343,256 100%
Democratic hold

List of representatives

Representative Party Tenure Notes/Events
District created in 1793
1 William Vans Murray Pro-Administration March 4, 1793–
March 3, 1795
Redistricted from the 5th district
Federalist March 4, 1795–
March 3, 1797
2 John Dennis Federalist March 4, 1797–
March 3, 1805
3 Charles Goldsborough Federalist March 4, 1805–
March 3, 1817
4 Thomas Bayly Federalist March 4, 1817–
March 3, 1823
5 John S. Spence Adams-Clay Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823–
March 3, 1825
6 Robert N. Martin Adams March 4, 1825–
March 3, 1827
7 Ephraim King Wilson Adams March 4, 1827–
March 3, 1829
style="background:Template:United States political party color" | Jackson March 4, 1829–
March 3, 1831
8 John S. Spence Anti-Jackson March 4, 1831–
March 3, 1833
9 John T. Stoddert style="background:Template:United States political party color" | Jackson March 4, 1833–
March 3, 1835
Redistricted to the 7th district
Seat abolished after the 1830 census
The seat was reinstated after the 1960 census, but its boundaries were not established until 1967.
10 Gilbert Gude Republican January 3, 1967–
January 3, 1977
Retired
11 Newton Steers Republican January 3, 1977–
January 3, 1979
Lost re-election
12 Michael D. Barnes Democratic January 3, 1979–
January 3, 1987
Retired in an unsuccessful run for U.S. Senate
13 Connie Morella Republican January 3, 1987–
January 3, 2003
Lost re-election
14 Chris Van Hollen Democratic January 3, 2003–
Present
Incumbent

External links

  • FairVote.org: Maryland's Redistricting News March 16, 2001-October 18, 2001
  • District boundaries, 1992-2002

Sources

  • Archives of Maryland Historical List United States Representatives Maryland State Archives
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

Coordinates: 39°06′N 77°15′W / 39.1°N 77.25°W / 39.1; -77.25

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