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United States House of Representatives elections in Idaho, 2014

 

United States House of Representatives elections in Idaho, 2014

United States House of Representatives elections in Idaho, 2014

November 4, 2014 (2014-11-04)

All 2 Idaho seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 2 0
Seats won 2 0
Seat change
Popular vote 275,072 160,078
Percentage 63.21% 36.79%

Elections for both of Idaho's House seats took place on November 4, 2014.

Contents

  • District 1 1
    • Primary results 1.1
    • General election results 1.2
  • District 2 2
    • Endorsements 2.1
    • Primary results 2.2
    • General election results 2.3
  • References 3
  • External links 4

District 1

Republican Raúl Labrador has represented Idaho's 1st congressional district since 2011. Labrador won election to a second term in 2012, defeating former NFL player Jimmy Farris with 63% of the vote.

Labrador was rumored to be considering a run for governor in 2014, but has announced he will run for re-election instead.[1]

Reed McCandless, who received 19% in the 2012 Republican primary, is challenging Labrador again. Also running in the Republican primary are Rathdrum resident Sean Blackwell, Boise resident Lisa Marie, and Eagle resident Michael Greenway.[2]

Although Farris initially expressed interest in a rematch against Labrador, in July 2013 he told the Idaho Statesman he was leaning towards a run for a Boise-based seat in the Idaho Legislature instead.[3]

In August 2013, State Representative Shirley Ringo of Moscow announced she is running for the Democratic nomination.[4] Hayden resident Ryan Barone also ran in the Democratic primary.[2]

Primary results

Republican primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Raúl Labrador 56,206 78.6
Republican Lisa Marie 5,164 7.2
Republican Michael Greenway 3,494 4.9
Republican Reed McCandless 3,373 4.7
Republican Sean Blackwell 3,304 4.6
Total votes 71,541 100
Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shirley Ringo 9,047 82.0
Democratic Ryan Barone 1,981 18.0
Total votes 11,028 100

General election results

Idaho's 1st Congressional district election, 2014[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Raúl Labrador (Incumbent) 143,580 65.01
Democratic Shirley Ringo 77,277 34.99
Other Write-ins 7 <0.01
Majority 66,303 30.02%
Total votes 220,864 100
Republican hold
External links
  • Raul Labrador campaign website
  • Shirley Ringo campaign website

District 2

Republican Mike Simpson has represented Idaho's 2nd congressional district since 1999. Simpson won reelection in 2012, defeating Democratic State Senator Nicole LeFavour with 65% of the vote.

In 2014 Simpson faced a primary challenge from Idaho Falls attorney Bryan Smith.[7]

Former Congressman Richard H. Stallings, who represented this seat from 1985-93, was the sole Democratic candidate.[8]

Endorsements

Primary results

Republican primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Simpson 48,632 61.6
Republican Bryan Smith 30,263 38.4
Total votes 78,896 100
Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard H. Stallings 14,547 100

General election results

Idaho's 2nd Congressional district election, 2014[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Simpson (Incumbent) 131,492 61.36
Democratic Richard H. Stallings 82,801 38.64
Majority 48,691 22.72
Total votes 214,293 100
Republican hold
External links
  • Mike Simpson campaign website
  • Bryan Smith campaign website

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^ Popkey, Dan. "Awaiting dominoes, Jimmy Farris eyes Idaho Legislature" Idaho Statesman, July 22, 2013. (accessed 20 September 2013)
  4. ^
  5. ^ a b c d
  6. ^ a b
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External links

  • U.S. House elections in Idaho, 2014 at Ballotpedia
  • Campaign contributions at OpenSecrets.org
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