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United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2010

The 2010 congressional elections in New Jersey were held on November 4, 2010 to determine who would represent the state of New Jersey in the United States House of Representatives. New Jersey has thirteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 2011 until January 2013.

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • Match-up summary 2
  • Overview 3
  • District 1 4
  • District 2 5
  • District 3 6
    • Polling 6.1
  • District 4 7
  • District 5 8
  • District 6 9
  • District 7 10
  • District 8 11
  • District 9 12
  • District 10 13
  • District 11 14
  • District 12 15
    • Polling 15.1
  • District 13 16
  • References 17
  • External links 18

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2010[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 1,055,299 49.74% 7 +2
Democratic 1,024,730 48.30% 6 -2
Libertarian 8,536 0.40% 0
Green 7,494 0.35% 0
Constitution 4,120 0.19% 0
Independents 21,405 1.01% 0
Totals 2,121,584 100.00% 13

Match-up summary

District Incumbent 2010 Status Democratic Republican Other Other Other
1 Rob Andrews Re-election Rob Andrews Dale Glading Mark Heacock (G) Margaret Chapman Nicky Petrutz
2 Frank LoBiondo Re-election Gary Stein Frank LoBiondo Peter Boyce (C) Mark Lovett Vitov Valdes-Munoz
3 John Adler Re-election John Adler Jon Runyan Russ Conger (L) Peter DeStefano (Tea) Lawrence Donahue
4 Chris Smith Re-election Howard Kleinhendler Chris Smith Steven Welzer (G) Joe Siano (L) David Meiswinkle
5 Scott Garrett Re-election Tod Thiese Scott Garrett Ed Fanning (G) Mark Quick James Radigan
6 Frank Pallone Re-election Frank Pallone Anna C. Little Jack Freudenheim Karen Anne Zaletel
7 Leonard Lance Re-election Ed Potosnak Leonard Lance
8 Bill Pascrell Re-election Bill Pascrell Roland Straten Ray Giangrasso
9 Steve Rothman Re-election Steve Rothman Michael Agosta Patricia Alessandrini (G)
10 Donald M. Payne Re-election Donald M. Payne Michael Alonso Joanne Miller Robert Louis Toussaint
11 Rodney Frelinghuysen Re-election Douglas Herbert Rodney Frelinghuysen Jim Gawron (L)
12 Rush D. Holt Jr. Re-election Rush D. Holt Jr. Scott M. Sipprelle Kenneth Cody
13 Albio Sires Re-election Albio Sires Henrietta Dwyer Maximo Gomez Nacer Anthony Zanowic

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2010[2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Republican 1,055,299 49.7% 5 6 +1
Democratic 1,024,730 48.3% 8 7 -1
Independent 41,555 1.95% 0 0 0
Total 2,121,584 100.00% 13 13

District 1

Democrat Rob Andrews has been in congress since 1991. He won re-election in 2008 with 72%. His 2010 Republican opponent is Dale Glading. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Democrat.

District 2

Republican Frank LoBiondo has been in congress since 1994. He won re-election in 2008 with 59%. His 2010 Democratic opponent is Gary Stein. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Republican.

District 3

Democratic incumbent John Adler is running for reelection, challenged by Republican nominee Jon Runyan, NJ Tea Party nominee Peter DeStefano, Libertarian nominee Russ Conger, and Your Country Again nominee Lawrence J. Donahue.

Retired NFL player Jon Runyan was a star offensive lineman who played most of his career with the nearby Philadelphia Eagles (the Southern Jersey district is a suburb of Philadelphia). In May he took the unusual step of revealing some controversial information about himself: that he was late to pay some taxes and was sued in some business dealings. He says he is "a different type of candidate" by acknowledging his mistakes. With $1.7 million in Adler's campaign account back in April, he has a major cash advantage. CQ Politics rates this election as Lean Democrat. Cook rates the district at R+1.

On October 8, 2010, CourierPostOnline.com reported that Steve Ayscue, the paid head of operations for the Camden County Democratic Committee (CCDC), and Geoff Mackler, sent by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee to manage John Adler's campaign, devised a plan to put a candidate on the ballot to divert votes from Republican Jon Runyan. They presented the plan at CCDC Headquarters during a May 26 meeting of the South Jersey Young Democrats, and some of those present joined in circulating a petition to place Peter DeStefano, owner-operator of a picture-framing business, on the ballot. DeStefano will appear on the "NJ Tea Party" line on the November 2 ballot. The article reports, "A Democratic operative with knowledge of the Adler campaign's operation said Ayscue is in charge of the campaign website, Facebook and Twitter accounts promoting the DeStefano campaign." [3]

In 2008, State Senator John Adler defeated Chris Myers, a town councilman, with 52% of the vote, while Obama carried the district with the same amount.

Adler died on April 4, 2011, four months after his defeat.

Polling

Poll Source Dates Administered John Adler (D) Jon Runyan (R) Peter DeStafano (I) Undecided
Monmouth University October 22–25, 2010 43% 48% - 4%
Rutgers-Eagleton October 23–24, 2010 46% 45% 4% 6%
Stockton/Zogby October 18–22, 2010 37% 40% 4.9% 16%
The Monmouth University/Gannett New Jersey Press Media Poll September 24–28, 2010 42% 39% 4% 13%
Rutgers-Eagleton September 23–26, 2010 44% 38% 6% 12%
Stockton/Zogby September 21–23, 2010 38% 30% 7.6% 23%
Rutgers University August 5–8, 2010 31% 25% 4% --
35% 28% -- --
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research† June 27–30, 2010 51% 34% 12% --

†Internal poll for Adler campaign

District 4

Republican Chris Smith has been in congress since 1980. In 2008, he won re-election with 66%. His 2010 Democratic opponent is Howard Kleinhendler. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Republican.

District 5

Republican Scott Garrett has been in congress since 2002. In 2008, he won re-election with 56%. His 2010 Democratic opponent is Tod Thiese. Ed Fanning is the Green Party Candidate http://www.newmenu.org/edfanning CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Republican.

District 6

Democrat Frank Pallone has been in congress since 1988. In 2008, he won re-election with 67%. His 2010 Republican opponent is Anna Little, the Mayor of Highlands. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Democrat.

District 7

Republican Leonard Lance is a Freshman. In 2008, State Senator and Minority Leader Lance defeated Assemblywoman Linda Stender with 50%. The Democratic challenger is former high school science teacher Ed Potosnak, who if elected would be the first openly gay member of New Jersey's congressional delegation. Despite the bare majority received by Lance in the 2008 election, CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Republican.

District 8

Democrat Bill Pascrell has been in congress since 1996. In 2008, he won re-election with 71%. His 2010 Republican opponent is Roland Straten. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Democrat.

District 9

Democrat Steve Rothman has been in congress since 1996. In 2008, he won re-election with 68%. His 2010 Republican opponent is Michael Agosta. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Democrat.

District 10

Democrat Don Payne has been in congress since 1988. In 2008, he won re-election unopposed. His 2010 Republican opponent is Michael Alonso. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Democrat.

District 11

Republican Rodney Frelinghuysen has been in congress since 1994. In 2008, he won re-election with 62%. His 2010 Democratic opponent is Army veteran and attorney Douglas Herbert. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Republican.

District 12

Democratic incumbent Rush Holt is running for reelection, challenged by Republican nominee businessman Scott Sipprelle and Truth, Vision, Hope nominee Kenneth J. Cody.

Holt has represented the district since 1998. In 2008, he won re-election with 63%. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Democrat, Cook Political Report rates it Likely Democrat,[4] and Real Clear Politics rates it as Lean Democrat.[5]

Polling

Poll Source Dates Administered Rush Holt (D) Scott Sipprelle (R) Undecided
National Research October 27, 2010 42% 43% -
Monmouth University October 25–27, 2010 51% 43% 4%
Monmouth University October 9–12, 2010 51% 46% 3%

District 13

Democrat Albio Sires has been in congress since 2006. In 2008, he won re-election with 75%. His 2010 Republican opponent is Henrietta Dwyer. CQ Politics rates this election as Safe Democrat.

References

  1. ^ Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives - 404
  2. ^ Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives
  3. ^ Jane Roh (2010-10-08). "Dems picked spoiler candidate". CourierPostOnline.com. Retrieved 2010-10-08. 
  4. ^ "The Cook Political Report - Charts - 2010 House Competitive Races". Cookpolitical.com. 2010-08-12. Retrieved 2010-08-22. 
  5. ^ "2010 Election Maps - Battle for the House". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved 2010-08-22. 

External links

  • Division of Elections at the New Jersey Secretary of State
    • Official candidate list
  • U.S. Congress candidates for New Jersey at Project Vote Smart
  • New Jersey U.S. House from OurCampaigns.com
  • Campaign contributions for U.S. Congressional races in New Jersey from OpenSecrets.org
  • 2010 New Jersey General Election graph of multiple polls from Pollster.com
  • House - New Jersey from the Cook Political Report
Preceded by
2008 elections
United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey
2010
Succeeded by
2012 elections
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