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United States Senate election in Florida, 2016

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United States Senate election in Florida, 2016

United States Senate election in Florida, 2016

November 8, 2016

 
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Marco Rubio
Republican

The 2016 United States Senate election in Florida will take place on November 8, 2016, to elect a member of the United States Senate to represent the State of Florida, concurrently with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the United States Senate in other states and elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections.

Incumbent Republican Senator Marco Rubio openly considered whether to seek re-election or run for President in 2016.[1][2][3] He stated in April 2014 that he would not run for both the Senate and President in 2016, as Florida law prohibits a candidate from appearing twice on a ballot, but did not rule out running for either office.[4] In April 2015, he announced that he was running for President[5] and would not seek re-election.[6][7][8] Rubio has said he will not run for re-election to the Senate even if he drops out of the GOP presidential primary before he has to qualify for the 2016 ballot.[9]

Republican primary

In June 2013, former Republican Congressman Allen West said that he may challenge Rubio in the primary[10] and said the same September that he would definitely run for the Senate if Rubio ran for President.[11] However, in November 2014, he moved from Florida to Texas to become CEO of the National Center for Policy Analysis, ending his interest in the race.[12]

Candidates

Declared

Potential

Declined

Endorsements

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Vern
Buchanan
Ron
DeSantis
Don
Gaetz
David
Jolly
George
LeMieux
Carlos
López-Cantera
Bill
McCollum
Jeff
Miller
Tom
Rooney
Todd
Wilcox
Other/
Undecided
Public Policy Polling September 11–13, 2015 377 ± 5.1% 15% 18% 14% 52%
Mason-Dixon July 20–24, 2015 500 ± 4.5% 8% 11% 7% 22% 6% 1% 45%
9% 16% 10% 8% 2% 55%
St. Pete Polls July 15, 2015 1,074 ± 3.0% 9.3% 22.1% 11.1% 12.1% 45.6%
Gravis Marketing June 16—20, 2015 729 ± 3.6% 16% 7% 25% 6% 46%
St. Leo University May 25–31, 2015 425 ± 4.5% 6% 4% 6% 3% 7% 16% 8% 43%
Mason-Dixon Apr. 14–16, 2015 425 ± 4.8% 7% 4% 1% 8% 3% 4% 20% 5% 48%
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jeff
Atwater
Pam
Bondi
Carlos
López-Cantera
Adam
Putnam
Allen
West
Other/
Undecided
Public Policy Polling March 19–22, 2015 425 ± 4.8% 12% 25% 8% 38% 18%
41% 15% 43%
Gravis Marketing February 24–25, 2015 513 ± 4% 9% 36% 12% 43%
Public Policy Polling September 4–7, 2014 818 ± 3.4% 17% 38% 16% 29%

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Potential

Declined

Endorsements

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Gwen
Graham
Alan
Grayson
Pam
Keith
Patrick
Murphy
Other/
Undecided
Public Policy Polling September 11–13, 2015 368 ± 5.1% 33% 27% 39%
Mason-Dixon July 20–24, 2015 500 ± 4.5% 11% 24% 26% 39%
33% 32% 35%
St. Pete Polls July 15, 2015 1,018 ± 3.1% 29.7% 7.7% 23.2% 39.4%
Gravis Marketing June 16–20, 2015 881 ± 3.3% 63% 19% 18%
Vox Populi Polling June 15–17, 2015 717 ± 3.7% 24% 34% 42%
St. Leo University May 25–31, 2015 535 ± 4.5% 24% 27% 49%
Mason-Dixon April 14–16, 2015 400 ± 5% 14% 23% 63%
Public Policy Polling March 19–22, 2015 371 ± 5.1% 22% 21% 56%

Libertarian Party

On October 1, 2015, Adrian Wyllie and Lynn House, Chair and Vice Chair respectively of the Libertarian Party of Florida, resigned their seats in protest after the executive committee refused to oust candidate Augustus Invictus from the party. According to Wyllie, Invictus had defended eugenics, called for a new Civil War, and brutally slaughtered a goat, and is not representative of the Libertarian Party. Invictus has refuted these claims, calling Wyllie's accusations, "deliberate misrepresentation[s]."[87]

Candidates

Declared

Potential

General election

Polling

With Atwater
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jeff
Atwater (R)
Alan
Grayson (D)
Other Undecided
Quinnipiac University March 17–28, 2015 1,087 ± 3% 42% 32% 1% 25%
Public Policy Polling March 19–22, 2015 923 ± 3.2% 41% 40% 19%
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jeff
Atwater (R)
Patrick
Murphy (D)
Other Undecided
Quinnipiac University March 17–28, 2015 1,087 ± 3% 38% 34% 1% 27%
Public Policy Polling March 19–22, 2015 923 ± 3.2% 41% 39% 20%
Mason-Dixon March 3–5, 2015 800 ± 3.5% 46% 32% 22%
With DeSantis
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ron
DeSantis (R)
Alan
Grayson (D)
Other Undecided
Quinnipiac University September 25-October 5, 2015 1,173 ± 2.9% 31% 37% 1% 26%
Quinnipiac University June 4-15, 2015 1,147 ± 2.9% 32% 38% 1% 29%
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ron
DeSantis (R)
Patrick
Murphy (D)
Other Undecided
Quinnipiac University September 25-October 5, 2015 1,173 ± 2.9% 30% 37% 1% 29%
Quinnipiac University June 4-15, 2015 1,147 ± 2.9% 31% 39% 1% 29%
St. Leo University May 25–31, 2015 535 ± 4.5% 14% 33% 53%
With Jolly
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
David
Jolly (R)
Patrick
Murphy (D)
Other Undecided
St. Leo University May 25–31, 2015 535 ± 4.5% 14% 35% 52%
With Lopez-Cantera
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Carlos
López-Cantera (R)
Alan
Grayson (D)
Other Undecided
Quinnipiac University September 25-October 5, 2015 1,173 ± 2.9% 32% 35% 1% 27%
Quinnipiac University June 4-15, 2015 1,147 ± 2.9% 31% 37% 1% 31%
Quinnipiac University March 17–28, 2015 1,087 ± 3% 33% 32% 1% 34%
Public Policy Polling March 19–22, 2015 923 ± 3.2% 36% 40% 24%
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Carlos
López-Cantera (R)
Patrick
Murphy (D)
Other Undecided
Quinnipiac University September 25-October 5, 2015 1,173 ± 2.9% 29% 37% 1% 30%
Quinnipiac University June 4-15, 2015 1,147 ± 2.9% 28% 40% 1% 32%
St. Leo University May 25–31, 2015 535 ± 4.5% 15% 30% 56%
Quinnipiac University March 17–28, 2015 1,087 ± 3% 31% 35% 1% 33%
Public Policy Polling March 19–22, 2015 923 ± 3.2% 34% 41% 25%

See also

References

  1. ^ Rubin, Jennifer (August 5, 2013) "Prepping for 2016: Marco Rubio", The Washington Post. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  2. ^ Feldmann, Linda (September 4, 2013) "2016 contenders: Why Syria is tough for GOP's Marco Rubio", Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved September 7, 2013.
  3. ^ Sink, Justin (September 6, 2013) "Rubio to tackle future of US, GOP", The Hill. Retrieived September 7, 2013.
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External Links

Official campaign websites
  • Ron DeSantis for Senate
  • Alan Grayson for Senate
  • David Jolly for Senate
  • Pam Keith for Senate
  • Carlos Lopez-Cantera for Senate
  • Patrick Murphy for Senate
  • Todd Wilcox for Senate
  • Augustus Invictus for Senate
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