World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

United States Senate election in New Jersey, 2008

Article Id: WHEBN0008244382
Reproduction Date:

Title: United States Senate election in New Jersey, 2008  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2008, List of United States Senators from New Jersey, Murray Sabrin, United States Senate elections in New Jersey, United States Senate elections, 2008
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

United States Senate election in New Jersey, 2008

United States Senate election in New Jersey, 2008

November 4, 2008

 
Nominee Frank Lautenberg Dick Zimmer
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,820,813 1,393,064
Percentage 55.5% 42.5%

County results

U.S. Senator before election

Frank Lautenberg
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Frank Lautenberg
Democratic

The 2008 United States Senate election in NJ was held on November 4, 2008. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Frank Lautenberg won re-election to a fifth, non-consecutive term.

Background

In November 2006, Senator Lautenberg had the lowest approval rating of any Democrat running for re-election in 2008 (with 39% approving and 45% disapproving),[1] with his approval improving only slightly to 42% as of September 2007. In the same September 2007 poll conducted by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, voters surveyed decided that Lautenberg does not deserve re-election (46% to 36%) and that he is too old to effectively serve another six years in the Senate (54% to 40%).[2]

Poll results suggested that given the right formula, this could have been a surprise upset race in November 2008. "The poll shows that Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who many voters say is too old to run for another term, would be vulnerable to a strong Republican candidate next year," according to Quinnipiac pollster Clay Richards.[2]

The first poll conducted after the primaries (Rasmussen Reports, June 4, 2008) showed a tighter than expected race between Lautenberg and Zimmer, with the two candidates in a virtual tie.[3]

However, the current political climate was also a major factor. Voter anger was targeted against the GOP and many Democrats once considered vulnerable managed to hold on.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Polling

Source Date Frank Lautenberg (D) Rob Andrews (D)
Rasmussen Reports May 15, 2008 49% 19%
Joel Benenson April 1–2, 2008 52% 21%

Results

2008 New Jersey U.S. Senate Democratic primary election[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Frank Lautenberg 203,012 58.9
Democratic Rob Andrews 121,777 35.3
Democratic Donald Cresitello 19,743 5.7
Turnout 344,532

Republican primary

Candidates

Results

2008 New Jersey U.S. Senate Republican primary election[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Dick Zimmer 84,663 45.8
Republican Joseph Pennacchio 74,546 40.3
Republican Murray Sabrin 25,576 13.8
Turnout 184,785

Official results, New Jersey Division of Elections (PDF, July 11, 2008)

County J. Pennacchio M. Sabrin R. Zimmer
Total 74,546 (40.3%) 25,576 (13.8%) 84,663 (45.8%)
Atlantic 1,322 (21.9%) 810 (13.4%) 3,909 (64.7%)
Bergen 10,761 (62.2%) 1,384 (8.0%) 5,145 (29.8%)
Burlington 2,869 (20.8%) 2,276 (16.5%) 8,629 (62.6%)
Camden 2,166 (34.2%) 1,036 (16.4%) 3,123 (49.4%)
Cape May 1,034 (20.1%) 483 (9.4%) 3,615 (70.4%)
Cumberland 395 (18.1%) 225 (10.3%) 1,566 (71.6%)
Essex 2,262 (35.6%) 493 (7.8%) 3,592 (56.6%)
Gloucester 2,161 (46.8%) 1,254 (27.1%) 1,206 (26.1%)
Hudson 955 (31.0%) 641 (20.8%) 1,487 (48.2%)
Hunterdon 2,730 (29.6%) 977 (10.6%) 5,519 (59.8%)
Mercer 1,538 (33.6%) 488 (10.7%) 2,555 (55.8%)
Middlesex 4,195 (53.7%) 1,021 (13.1%) 2,603 (33.3%)
Monmouth 4,630 (32.8%) 1,510 (10.7%) 7,981 (56.5%)
Morris 12,700 (56.1%) 1,855 (8.2%) 8,094 (35.7%)
Ocean 4,820 (21.4%) 6,778 (30.2%) 10,875 (48.4%)
Passaic 4,570 (71.6%) 545 (8.5%) 1,271 (19.9%)
Salem 657 (40.6%) 193 (11.9%) 769 (47.5%)
Somerset 4,875 (43.2%) 1,170 (10.4%) 5,227 (46.4%)
Sussex 3,621 (50.9%) 647 (9.1%) 2,850 (40.0%)
Union 4,653 (52.1%) 1,388 (15.5%) 2,896 (32.4%)
Warren 1,632 (43.1%) 402 (10.6%) 1,751 (46.3%)

General election

Candidates

Major

Minor

  • Jeff Boss (I)[5]
  • Daryl Mikell Brooks (I)[5]
  • J.M. Carter (I)[5]
  • Carl Peter Klapper (Write In)[6]
  • Sara Lobman (Socialist Workers)[5]
  • Jason Scheurer (Libertarian)[5]

Debates

On October 29, 2008, a debate between Lautenberg and Zimmer was held on the radio station NJ 101.5.[7]

On November 1, 2008, the two candidates debated for the second time on New Jersey Network, in the only televised debate agreed to by the Lautenberg campaign.[8]

Polling

Source Date Frank Lautenberg (D) Dick Zimmer (R)
Survey USA October 29–30, 2008 52% 37%
Strategic Vision October 24–26, 2008 49% 41%
Marist College October 20–21, 2008 48% 41%
Quinnipiac University October 16–19, 2008 55% 33%
Monmouth University October 15–18, 2008 52% 36%
Survey USA October 11–12, 2008 51% 38%
Rasmussen Reports October 7, 2008 51% 37%
Fairleigh Dickinson University Sep 29-Oct 5, 2008 50% 34%
Strategic Vision September 26–28, 2008 48% 41%
Survey USA September 27–28, 2008 51% 38%
Rasmussen Reports September 16, 2008 49% 42%
Strategic Vision September 14–16, 2008 47% 40%
Monmouth University September 11–14, 2008 46% 36%
Quinnipiac University September 10–14, 2008 48% 39%
The Record / Research 2000 September 9–11, 2008 49% 41%
Marist College September 5–8, 2008 51% 40%
Fairleigh Dickinson University September 4–7, 2008 46% 35%
Quinnipiac University August 4–10, 2008 48% 41%
Rasmussen Reports August 4, 2008 51% 33%
Club for Growth July 30–31, 2008 35% 36%
Monmouth University July 17–21, 2008 45% 37%
Strategic Vision July 11–13, 2008 48% 32%
Rasmussen Reports July 7, 2008 49% 36%
Fairleigh Dickinson University June 17–22, 2008 45% 28%
Quinnipiac University June 5–8, 2008 47% 38%
Rasmussen Reports June 4, 2008 45% 44%

Results

2008 New Jersey U.S. Senate general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Frank Lautenberg 1,951,218 56.0 +2.1
Republican Dick Zimmer 1,461,025 42.0 -2.0
Independent Daryl Mikell Brooks 20,920 1.0 n/a
Libertarian Jason Scheurer 18,810 0.5 n/a
Independent J.M. Carter 15,935 0.5 n/a
Independent Jeff Boss 10,345 0.3 n/a
Socialist Workers Sara Lobman 9,187 0.3 n/a
Majority 490,193
Turnout 3,482,445
Democratic hold Swing

References

  1. ^ "Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11152".  
  2. ^ a b "Voters still say Lautenberg is too old". PolitickerNJ.com, September 25, 2007. Accessed April 8, 2008.
  3. ^ "Election 2008: New Jersey Senate - New Jersey Senate Race a Dead Heat", Rasmussen Reports, June 9, 2008. Accessed June 9, 2008.
  4. ^ a b Official results for 2008 primary elections, New Jersey Division of Elections (PDF, July 11, 2008)
  5. ^ a b c d e 2008 General Election Candidate Certification, New Jersey Division of Elections. Accessed September 28, 2008
  6. ^ Populist Write-In Candidate for Senate, Carl Peter Klapper, Advocates Adjustable Equity Mortgages, Third Bank of the US to solve financial crisis
  7. ^ Burton, Cynthia. "Lautenberg and Zimmer spar over issues", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 30, 2008.
  8. ^ Schwaneberg, Robert. Lautenberg, Zimmer agree to debate on Nov. 1, The Star-Ledger, October 1, 2008.

External links

  • Division of Elections from the New Jersey Secretary of State
  • U.S. Congress candidates for New Jersey at Project Vote Smart
  • New Jersey, U.S. Senate from CQ Politics
  • New Jersey U.S. Senate from OurCampaigns.com
  • New Jersey U.S. Senate race from 2008 Race Tracker
  • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
  • Zimmer (R) vs Lautenberg (D-i) graph of multiple polls from Pollster.com
  • Official campaign websites
    • Frank Lautenberg, Democratic nominee
    • Dick Zimmer, Republican nominee
    • Jason Scheurer, Libertarian candidate
    • Daryl Mikell Brooks, Independent candidate
    • Carl Peter Klapper, Write-In Populist candidate
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.