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United States presidential election in Wyoming, 2004

 

United States presidential election in Wyoming, 2004

United States presidential election in Wyoming, 2004

November 2, 2004

 
Nominee George W. Bush John Kerry
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Texas Massachusetts
Running mate Dick Cheney John Edwards
Electoral vote 3 0
Popular vote 167,629 70,776
Percentage 68.9% 29.1%

County Results
  Kerry—50-60%
  Bush—50-60%
  Bush—60-70%
  Bush—70-80%
  Bush—80-90%

President before election

George W. Bush
Republican

Elected President

George W. Bush
Republican

The 2004 United States presidential election in Wyoming took place on November 2, 2004 throughout all 50 states and D.C., which was part of the 2004 United States presidential election. Voters chose three representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

red state. This was based on pre-election polling, the fact that the last Democrat to win here was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964, and how Bush carried this state in 2000 with almost 68% of the vote. On election day Bush won every county with over 65% except for Teton County, which Kerry won with 53% and Albany County, which Bush won with 54% of the vote.

Caucuses

Campaign

Predictions

There were 12 news organizations who made state by state predictions of the election. Here are their last predictions before election day.[1]

  1. D.C. Political Report: Solid Republican
  2. Associated Press: Solid Bush
  3. CNN: Bush
  4. Cook Political Report: Solid Republican
  5. Newsweek: Solid Bush
  6. New York Times: Leans Bush
  7. Rasmussen Reports: Bush
  8. Research 2000: Solid Bush
  9. Washington Post: Bush
  10. Washington Times: Solid Bush
  11. Zogby International: Bush
  12. Washington Dispatch: Bush

Polling

Only one pre-election poll was conducted. It showed Bush leading Kerry 65% to 29%.[2]

Fundraising

Bush raised $531,380.[3] Kerry raised $466,535.[4]

Advertising and visits

Neither campaign advertised or visited this state during the fall campaign.[5][6]

Analysis

Wyoming is a Republican bastion. The last Democrat to win a senate election was Gale W. McGee in 1970. The last Democrat to win the At large seat was Teno Roncalio in 1978. The last time the Democrats controlled the Wyoming House of Representatives was 1966. The last time Democrats controlled the Wyoming Senate was 1938. The state, however, did elect Democratic governors from 1974 to 2010 with only an eight-year interruption of Jim Geringer's tenure from 1995 too 2003.

In presidential elections, Wyoming is probably the most reliable red state in the country. The last Democrat to carry the state, or even crack the 40% mark, was LBJ in 1964, and before that was Harry Truman in 1948. Since 1968, every Republican carried this state by a double digit margin of victory, except in 1992. As far as popular vote percentage, the 2004 results were the third best performance by the Republican party since 1964, behind only Richard Nixon (69.0%) in 1972 and Ronald Reagan (70.5%) in 1984. As far as margin of victory, the 2004 election at 39.8%, was also the third best performance, behind only George W. Bush (40.1%) in 2000 and Ronald Reagan (42.3%) in 1984.

CNN exit polls showed 72% of the state approve of Bush, and 69% approve his decision to go to war.[7]

Results

United States presidential election in Wyoming, 2004[8]
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican George W. Bush (Inc.) Dick Cheney 167,629 68.9% 3
Democratic John Kerry John Edwards 70,776 29.1% 0
Independent Ralph Nader Peter Camejo 2,741 1.1% 0
Libertarian Michael Badnarik Richard Campagna 1,171 0.5% 0
Independent Michael Peroutka Chuck Baldwin 631 0.3% 0
Write Ins 480 0.2% 0
Totals - 100.00% 3
Voter turnout (Voting age population) 64.1%

Results breakdown

By county

Bush won all but one county.[9]
County Bush Votes Kerry Votes Others Votes Total
Albany 8,879 54.32% 7,032 43.02% 434 2.66% 16,345
BH 4,232 80.15% 960 18.18% 88 1.67% 5,280
Camp 12,407 82.25% 2,464 16.33% 214 1.42% 15,085
Carbon 4,758 67.39% 2,157 30.55% 145 2.05% 7,060
Converse 4,446 77.74% 1,183 20.69% 90 1.57% 5,719
Crook 2,836 83.63% 500 14.74% 55 1.62% 3,391
Fremont 11,428 66.95% 5,337 31.27% 305 1.79% 17,070
Goshen 4,114 70.94% 1,566 27.00% 119 2.05% 5,799
Hot Springs 1,811 73.02% 623 25.12% 46 1.85% 2,480
Johnson 3,231 79.88% 736 18.20% 78 1.93% 4,045
Laramie 25,947 65.19% 13,170 33.09% 684 1.72% 39,801
Lincoln 6,424 81.28% 1,363 17.24% 117 1.48% 7,904
Natrona 21,503 67.34% 9,852 30.85% 578 1.81% 31,933
Niobrara 1,064 81.04% 230 17.52% 19 1.45% 1,313
Park 10,660 76.85% 2,939 21.19% 273 1.97% 13,872
Platte 3,128 68.97% 1,318 29.06% 89 1.96% 4,535
Sher 9,635 69.19% 4,041 29.02% 249 1.79% 13,925
Sub 2,846 77.99% 730 20.01% 73 2.00% 3,649
Sweetwater 10,638 65.65% 5,201 32.10% 364 2.25% 16,203
Teton 5,124 45.21% 5,971 52.68% 239 2.11% 11,334
Uinta 6,080 75.38% 1,812 22.46% 174 2.16% 8,066
Wash 3,200 77.76% 855 20.78% 60 1.46% 4,115
Weston 2,739 80.89% 580 17.13% 67 1.98% 3,386

By congressional district

Due to the state's low population, only one congressional district is allocated. This district, called the At-Large district, because it covers the entire state, and thus is equivalent to the statewide election results.
District Bush Kerry Representative
At-large 68.9% 29.1% Barbara Cubin

Electors

Technically the voters of Wyoming cast their ballots for electors: representatives to the Electoral College. Wyoming is allocated three electors because it has one congressional districts and two senators. All candidates who appear on the ballot or qualify to receive write-in votes must submit a list of three electors, who pledge to vote for their candidate and his or her running mate. Whoever wins the majority of votes in the state is awarded all three electoral votes. Their chosen electors then vote for President and Vice President. Although electors are pledged to their candidate and running mate, they are not obligated to vote for them. An elector who votes for someone other than his or her candidate is known as a faithless elector.

The electors of each state and the District of Columbia met on December 13, 2004 to cast their votes for President and Vice President. The Electoral College itself never meets as one body. Instead the electors from each state and the District of Columbia met in their respective capitols.

The following were the members of the Electoral College from the state. All three were pledged for Bush/Cheney.[10]

  1. Linda Barker
  2. Jack Van Mark
  3. Mike Baker

References

  1. ^ http://www.dcpoliticalreport.com/members/2004/Pred2.htm#NW
  2. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/USPRESIDENT/GENERAL/CAMPAIGN/2004/polls.php?fips=56
  3. ^ http://www.campaignmoney.com/political/campaigns/george_w_bush.asp?cycle=04
  4. ^ http://www.campaignmoney.com/political/campaigns/john_f_kerry.asp?cycle=04
  5. ^ http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/special/president/tracking/
  6. ^ http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/special/president/campaign.ads/
  7. ^ http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/pages/results/states/WY/P/00/epolls.0.html
  8. ^ http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/pages/results/states/WY/
  9. ^ http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004//pages/results/states/WY/P/00/county.000.html
  10. ^ http://soswy.state.wy.us/election/2004/elector.htm

See also

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