World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Virginia's 5th congressional district

Article Id: WHEBN0007720887
Reproduction Date:

Title: Virginia's 5th congressional district  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: United States congressional delegations from Virginia, Robert Hurt (politician), Virgil Goode, Thomas S. Bocock, John Randolph of Roanoke
Collection: Congressional Districts of Virginia
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Virginia's 5th congressional district

Virginia's 5th congressional district
Virginia's 5th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Virginia's 5th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Robert Hurt (RChatham)
Cook PVI R+5[1]

Virginia's fifth congressional district is a United States congressional district in the commonwealth of Virginia. It covers all or part of Greene, Campbell, Bedford, Albemarle, Nelson, Fluvanna, Buckingham, Cumberland, Appomattox, Prince Edward, Charlotte, Lunenburg, Franklin, Henry, Pittsylvania, Halifax, Mecklenburg, Brunswick, Fauquier, Rappahannock and Madison Counties, as well as the independent cities of Bedford, Charlottesville (main site of the University of Virginia) and Danville, making it Virginia's largest district with an area of 10,181.03 square miles (26,368.7 km2) - 193 sq mi (500 km2), larger than New Jersey and Vermont.

The district's first representative in Congress was James Madison, who would later become the 4th President of the United States. The current Congressman is Republican Robert Hurt.

Contents

  • 2014 General Election 1
  • 2012 General Election 2
  • Voting 3
    • 2010 3.1
  • List of representatives 4
  • Historical district boundaries 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7

2014 General Election

Candidate Party Votes Percentage
Virginia's 5th Congressional District House Election, November 2014
Robert Hurt [Inc.] Republican 124,735 60.9%
Walter Lawrence Gaughan Democratic 73,482 35.9%
Kenneth Hildebrandt Independent 2,209 1.1%
All Others 224 0.1%
Total Votes Cast 204,948

[2]

2012 General Election

Candidate Party Votes Percentage
Virginia's 5th Congressional District House Election, November 2012
Robert Hurt [Inc.] Republican 193,009 55.4%
John Douglass Democratic 149,214 42.9%
Kenneth Hildebrandt Independent 5,500 1.6%
All Others 499 0.1%
Total Votes Cast 348,222

[3]

Voting

Election results from statewide races
Year Office Results
2012 President Romney 52 - 45%
2008 President McCain 51 - 48%
2004 President Bush 56 - 43%
2001 Governor Warner 52 - 46%
Lieutenant Governor Katzen 50 - 47%
Attorney General Kilgore 62 - 38%
2000 President Bush 55 - 41%
Senator Allen 57 - 43%
1997 Governor Gilmore 58 - 40%
Lieutenant Governor Payne 54 - 43%
Attorney General Earley 58 - 42%
1996 President Dole 48 - 43%
Senator Warner 52 - 48%

2010

Virginia's 5th Congressional District House Election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Robert Hurt 119,560 50.81%
Democratic Tom Perriello [Incumbent] 110,561 46.98%
Independent Jeffrey A. Clark 4,992 2.12%
Majority 8,999 3.83
Total votes 235,298 100
Republican gain from Democratic

List of representatives

Representative Lived Party Term Note
District created: March 4, 1789
James Madison (1751–1836) Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 – March 4, 1793 Elected to VA–15
George Hancock (1754–1820) Pro-Administration March 4, 1793 – March 4, 1795
Federalist March 4, 1795 – March 4, 1797 Declined to run
John J. Trigg (1748–1804) Democratic-Republican March 4, 1797 – March 4, 1803 Elected to VA–13
Thomas Lewis, Jr. (1760–1847) Federalist March 4, 1803 – March 5, 1804 Election invalidated
Andrew Moore (1752–1821) Democratic-Republican March 5, 1804 – August 11, 1804 Appointed to U.S. Senate
Vacant August 12, 1804 – December 3, 1804 Special election
Alexander Wilson Democratic-Republican December 4, 1804 – March 4, 1809 Declined to run
James Breckinridge (1763–1833) Federalist March 4, 1809 – March 4, 1817 Declined to run
John Floyd (1783–1837) Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 – March 4, 1823 Elected to VA-20
John Randolph (1773–1833) Crawford D-R March 4, 1823 – March 4, 1825
Jackson March 4, 1825 – December 26, 1825 Appointed to U.S. Senate
Vacant December 27, 1825 – January 20, 1826 Special election January 1826
George W. Crump (1786–1848) Jackson January 21, 1826 – March 4, 1827 Defeated
John Randolph (1773–1833) Jackson March 4, 1827 – March 4, 1829 Declined to run
Thomas T. Bouldin (1781–1834) Jackson March 4, 1829 – March 4, 1833 Defeated
John Randolph (1773–1833) Jackson March 4, 1833 – May 24, 1833 Died
Vacant May 25, 1833 – August 25, 1833 Special election
Thomas T. Bouldin (1781–1834) Jackson August 26, 1833 – February 11, 1834 Died
Vacant February 12, 1834 – March 14, 1834 Special election
James W. Bouldin (1792–1854) Jackson March 15, 1834 – March 4, 1837
Democratic March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1839 Declined to run
John Hill (1800–1880) Whig March 4, 1839 – March 4, 1841 Defeated
Edmund W. Hubard (1806–1878) Democratic March 4, 1841 – March 4, 1843 Elected to VA-4
Thomas W. Gilmer (1802–1844) Democratic March 4, 1843 – February 18, 1844 Appointed Secretary of the Navy
Vacant February 19, 1844 – May 9, 1844 Special election
William L. Goggin (1807–1870) Whig May 10, 1844 – March 4, 1845 Defeated
Shelton F. Leake (1812–1884) Democratic March 4, 1845 – March 4, 1847 Defeated
William L. Goggin (1807–1870) Whig March 4, 1847 – March 4, 1849 Defeated
Paulus Powell (1809–1874) Democratic March 4, 1849 – March 4, 1853 Elected to VA-6
Thomas S. Bocock (1815–1891) Democratic March 4, 1853 – March 4, 1861 Resigned
Vacant March 4, 1861 – January 26, 1870 Civil War
Robert Ridgway (1823–1870) Conservative January 27, 1870 – October 16, 1870 Died
Vacant October 17, 1870 – November 7, 1870 Special election November 1870
Richard T. W. Duke, Jr. (1822–1898) Conservative November 8, 1870 – March 4, 1871
Democratic March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1873 Defeated
Alexander M. Davis (1833–1889) Democratic March 4, 1873 – March 5, 1874 Election invalidated
Christopher Y. Thomas (1818–1879) Republican March 5, 1874 – March 4, 1875 Defeated
George C. Cabell (1836–1906) Democratic March 4, 1875 – March 4, 1887 Defeated
John R. Brown (1842–1927) Republican March 4, 1887 – March 4, 1889 Defeated
Posey G. Lester (1850–1929) Democratic March 4, 1889 – March 4, 1893 Declined to run
Claude A. Swanson (1862–1939) Democratic March 4, 1893 – January 30, 1906 Elected Governor of Virginia
Vacant January 31, 1906 – November 5, 1906
Edward W. Saunders (1860–1921) Democratic November 6, 1906 – February 29, 1920 Elected Virginia Supreme Court justice
Vacant March 1, 1920 – May 31, 1920 Special election
Rorer A. James (1859–1921) Democratic June 1, 1920 – August 6, 1921 Died
Vacant August 7, 1921 – November 7, 1921
J. Murray Hooker (1873–1940) Democratic November 8, 1921 – March 4, 1925 Declined to run
Joseph Whitehead (1867–1938) Democratic March 4, 1925 – March 4, 1931 Defeated
Thomas G. Burch (1869–1951) Democratic March 4, 1931 – March 4, 1933 Elected to VA-AL
District eliminated March 4, 1933
District recreated: January 3, 1935
Thomas G. Burch (1869–1951) Democratic January 3, 1935 – May 31, 1946 Appointed to U.S. Senate
Vacant May 31, 1946 – November 5, 1946
Thomas B. Stanley (1890–1970) Democratic November 5, 1946 – February 3, 1953 Resigned to run for Governor of Virginia
Vacant February 3, 1953 – April 14, 1953 Special election April 14, 1953
William M. Tuck (1896–1983) Democratic April 14, 1953 – January 3, 1969 Declined to run
W. C. "Dan" Daniel (1914–1988) Democratic January 3, 1969 – January 23, 1988 Died
Vacant January 23, 1988 – June 14, 1988 Special election June 14, 1988
Lewis F. Payne, Jr. (b. 1945) Democratic June 14, 1988 – January 3, 1997 Declined to run
Virgil H. Goode, Jr. (b. 1946) Democratic January 3, 1997 – January 27, 2000
Independent January 27, 2000 – August 1, 2002
Republican August 1, 2002 – January 3, 2009 Defeated
Thomas S. P. Perriello (b. 1974) Democratic January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011 Defeated
Robert Hurt (b. 1969) Republican January 3, 2011 – present Incumbent

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ http://historical.elections.virginia.gov/elections/search/year_from:2014/year_to:2014/office_id:5/district_id:27258/stage:General
  3. ^ http://historical.elections.virginia.gov/elections/search/year_from:2012/year_to:2012/office_id:5/district_id:27258/stage:General
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.