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Vocal music

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Vocal music

Vocal music is a genre of music performed by one or more singers, with or without instrumental accompaniment (a cappella), in which singing (i.e. vocal performance) provides the main focus of the piece.[1] Music which employs singing but does not feature it prominently is generally considered instrumental music (e.g. the wordless women's choir in the final movement of Holst's The Planets) as is music without singing. Music without any non-vocal instrumental accompaniment is referred to as a cappella.[2]

Vocal music typically features sung words called lyrics, although there are notable examples of vocal music that are performed using non-linguistic syllables, sounds, or noises, sometimes as musical onomatopoeia. A short piece of vocal music with lyrics is broadly termed a song.

Vocal music is probably the oldest form of music, since it does not require any instrument besides the human voice. All musical cultures have some form of vocal music.

Contents

  • Vocal music without lyrics 1
    • World traditions 1.1
    • European classical vocal music 1.2
    • Jazz and popular music 1.3
  • Vocal music with lyrics 2
    • Songs 2.1
    • Extended techniques that involve lyrics 2.2
  • Wide-ranging voices 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Vocal music without lyrics

World traditions

  • Elaborate untexted vocal improvisation was and still is an important element in Turkish and Middle Eastern music traditions. Such music existed prior to the 13th century and the First Crusade into Palestine and the city of Jerusalem, possibly even before the year 900.
  • The modern descendants of the ancient Kung tribes and clans of Southern Africa utilize similar traditional music techniques.
  • A form of improvisation known as thillana is a very important feature of Carnatic music from South India.
  • Tuvan throat singing often features wordless and improvised song. The sygyt technique is a particularly good example of this.
  • The Anglo-Saxon and Gaelic communities.
  • Hasidic Jews use a form of voice improvisation called nigunim. This consists of wordless tunes vocalized with sounds such as "Bim-bim-bam" or "Ai-yai-yai!” often accompanied by rhythmic clapping and drumming on the table.
  • Puirt a beul, also known as "Mouth Music", is a Scottish technique based around imitating the sounds of bagpipes, fiddles, and other instruments used in traditional Scottish music. It was popularized in North America by Scottish immigrants, and has been incorporated into many forms of American music from roots music to bluegrass.

European classical vocal music

Solfege, a vocalized musical scale, assigns various syllables such as ‘‘Do-Re-Mi‘‘ to each note. A variety of similar tools are found in traditional Indian music, and scat singing of jazz.

Jazz and popular music

Hip hop music has a very distinct form of vocal percussion known as beatboxing. It involves creating beats, rhythms, and scratching.

The singer of the Icelandic group Sigur Rós, Jón Þór Birgisson, often uses vocals without words, as does Icelandic singer/songwriter, Björk. Her album Medúlla is composed entirely of processed and acoustic vocal music, including beatboxing, choral arrangements and throat singing.

Singer Bobby McFerrin has recorded a number of albums using only his voice and body, sometimes consisting of a texted melody supported by untexted vocalizations.

Vocal music with lyrics

Songs

See Song and for short forms of music with sung words. songs like this are more popular now than just music

Extended techniques that involve lyrics

The Second Viennese School, especially Alban Berg and Arnold Schoenberg, pioneered a technique called Sprechstimme in which singers half-talk, half-sing, and only approximate pitches.

Wide-ranging voices

See also

References

  1. ^ Allmusic. Vocal music. Retrieved October 23, 2008.
  2. ^ Titze, I. R. (2008). The human instrument. Sci.Am. 298 (1):94-101. PM 18225701
  3. ^ "Lucrezia Aguiari, dite La Bastardella ou La Bastardina ou Lucrezia Agujari, dite La Bastardella ou La Bastardina. Encyclopédie Larousse"
  4. ^ a b "Encyclopédie Larousse. Chant"
  5. ^ Ira Siff, « I vespri siciliani » in Opera News, March 2008.
  6. ^ Ardoin, John (1991). The Callas Legacy. Old Tappen, New Jersey: Scribner and Sons.  
  7. ^ a b L'Invité Du Dimanche, The Callas Conversations, Vol. 2 [DVD] 2007, EMI Classics.
  8. ^ David A. Lowe, ed (1986). Callas: As They Saw Her. New York: Ungar Publishing Company. ISBN 0-8044-5636-4.
  9. ^ F Haböck, Die Gesangkunst der Kastraten, (Vienna, 1923), p. 209
  10. ^ Soto-Morettini, D. (2006), Popular Singing: A Practical Guide To: Pop, Jazz, Blues, Rock, Country and Gospel, A & C Black,  
  11. ^ Saint Bris, Gonzague (2009). La Malibran (in French). Belfond. p. 25.  
  12. ^ Saint Bris, Gonzague (2009). La Malibran (in French). Belfond. pp. 37 and 104.  
  13. ^ Nicholas E. Limansky (Translated from English by Jean-Jacques Groleau): Mado Robin, soprano (1918 - 1960)
  14. ^ Ellen Highstein: 'Yma Sumac (Chavarri, Emperatriz)' Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy. (Accessed 8 August 2006)
  15. ^ Clarke Fountain, "Yma Sumac: Hollywood's Inca Princess (review). Allmovie, reproduced in the New York Times. 1992. [1]
  16. ^ David Richards, "The Trill of a Lifetime; Exotic Singer Yma Sumac Meets a New Wave of Fans." The Washington Post, March 2, 1987, STYLE; PAGE B1. Accessed August 6, 2006, via Lexis Nexis, [2]
  17. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3zUkRb9CSU
  18. ^ http://therangeplace.forummotions.com/t39-axl-rose

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