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Weightlifting at the 2000 Summer Olympics

 

Weightlifting at the 2000 Summer Olympics

The Weightlifting Competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia saw the introduction of women's weightlifting.

Contents

  • Medal summary 1
    • Men's competition 1.1
    • Women's competition 1.2
  • Participating nations 2
  • Medal table 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Medal summary

Men's competition

Event Gold Silver Bronze
– 56 kg
[a]
 Halil Mutlu
Turkey (TUR)
 Wu Wenxiong
China (CHN)
 Zhang Xiangxiang
China (CHN)
– 62 kg
[b]
 Nikolaj Pešalov
Croatia (CRO)
 Leonidas Sabanis
Greece (GRE)
 Gennady Oleshchuk
Belarus (BLR)
– 69 kg
 Galabin Boevski
Bulgaria (BUL)
 Georgi Markov
Bulgaria (BUL)
 Sergey Lavrenov
Belarus (BLR)
– 77 kg
 Zhan Xugang
China (CHN)
 Viktor Mitrou
Greece (GRE)
 Arsen Melikyan
Armenia (ARM)
– 85 kg
 Pyrros Dimas
Greece (GRE)
 Marc Huster
Germany (GER)
 Giorgi Asanidze
(GEO)
– 94 kg
 Kakhi Kakhiashvili
Greece (GRE)
 Szymon Kołecki
Poland (POL)
 Aleksei Petrov
Russia (RUS)
– 105 kg
 Hossein Tavakkoli
Iran (IRI)
 Alan Tsagaev
Bulgaria (BUL)
 Said Saif Asaad
Qatar (QAT)
105 kg
[c]
 Hossein Rezazadeh
Iran (IRI)
 Ronny Weller
Germany (GER)
 Andrei Chemerkin
Russia (RUS)
  • a Ivan Ivanov of Bulgaria originally won the silver medal, but was disqualified after testing positive for furosemide. The rest of the competitors were elevated by one position accordingly.[1]
  • b Sevdalin Minchev of Bulgaria originally won the bronze medal, but was disqualified after testing positive for furosemide. The rest of the competitors were elevated by one position accordingly.[1]
  • c Ashot Danielyan of Armenia originally won the bronze medal, but was disqualified after testing positive for stanozolol. The rest of the competitors were elevated by one position accordingly.[2]

Women's competition

Event Gold Silver Bronze
– 48 kg
[d]
 Tara Nott
United States (USA)
 Raema Lisa Rumbewas
Indonesia (INA)
 Sri Indriyani
Indonesia (INA)
– 53 kg
 Yang Xia
China (CHN)
 Li Fengying
Chinese Taipei (TPE)
 Winarni Binti Slamet
Indonesia (INA)
– 58 kg
 Soraya Jiménez
Mexico (MEX)
 Ri Song-Hui
North Korea (PRK)
 Khassaraporn Suta
Thailand (THA)
– 63 kg
 Chen Xiaomin
China (CHN)
 Valentina Popova
Russia (RUS)
 Ioanna Khatziioannou
Greece (GRE)
– 69 kg
 Lin Weining
China (CHN)
 Erzsébet Márkus
Hungary (HUN)
 Karnam Malleswari
India (IND)
– 75 kg
 María Isabel Urrutia
Colombia (COL)
 Ruth Ogbeifo
Nigeria (NGR)
 Kuo Yi-Hang
Chinese Taipei (TPE)
75 kg
 Ding Meiyuan
China (CHN)
 Agata Wróbel
Poland (POL)
 Cheryl Haworth
United States (USA)
  • d Izabela Dragneva of Bulgaria originally won the gold medal, but was disqualified after testing positive for furosemide. The rest of the competitors were elevated by one position accordingly.[1]

Participating nations

A total number of 261 weightlifters from 73 nations competed at the Sydney Games:

Medal table

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  China (CHN) 5 1 1 7
2  Greece (GRE) 2 2 1 5
3  Iran (IRI) 2 0 0 2
4  Bulgaria (BUL) 1 2 0 3
5  United States (USA) 1 0 1 2
6  Colombia (COL) 1 0 0 1
 Croatia (CRO) 1 0 0 1
 Mexico (MEX) 1 0 0 1
 Turkey (TUR) 1 0 0 1
10  Germany (GER) 0 2 0 2
 Poland (POL) 0 2 0 2
12  Indonesia (INA) 0 1 2 3
 Russia (RUS) 0 1 2 3
14  Chinese Taipei (TPE) 0 1 1 2
15  Hungary (HUN) 0 1 0 1
 Nigeria (NGR) 0 1 0 1
 North Korea (PRK) 0 1 0 1
18  Belarus (BLR) 0 0 2 2
19  Thailand (THA) 0 0 1 1
  (GEO) 0 0 1 1
 India (IND) 0 0 1 1
 Qatar (QAT) 0 0 1 1
 Armenia (ARM) 0 0 1 1
Total 15 15 15 45

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Bulgarian lifters sent home". BBC Sport. 22 September 2000. 
  2. ^ "Two more fail drug tests". BBC Sport. 1 October 2000. 
  • "Olympic Medal Winners".  
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