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World Rugby Under 20 Championship

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Title: World Rugby Under 20 Championship  
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World Rugby Under 20 Championship

World Rugby Under 20 Championship
Current season or competition:
2015 World Rugby Under 20 Championship
Competition logo
Sport Rugby union
Instituted 2008
Number of teams 12
Country International (World Rugby)
Holders  England (2014)

The World Rugby Under 20 Championship (known as the IRB Junior World Championship until 2014) is an international World Rugby, and is contested by 12 men's junior national teams with an under-20 age requirement. This event replaced the IRB's former age-grade world championships, the Under 19 and Under 21 World Championships.

The inaugural tournament was held in June 2008, hosted by Wales and with 16 teams participating. Wales was announced as host for the inaugural tournament in November 2007.[1] The number of participating nations was reduced to 12 before the 2010 tournament due to financial reasons.[2]

The U20 Championship is the upper level of the World Rugby tournament structure for under-20 national sides. At the same time that the it was launched, World Rugby (then known as the International Rugby Board) also launched a second-level competition, the trophy, featuring eight teams.

Promotion and relegation between the Trophy and the Championship is in place. The winner of the Trophy will play in next year's Championship, while the last placed team at the Championship will be relegated to the Trophy for the next year.

Tournament results

Year Host Final Third place match
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd place Score 4th place
2008  Wales
New Zealand
38–3
England

South Africa
43–18
Wales
2009  Japan
New Zealand
44–28
England

South Africa
32–5
Australia
2010  Argentina
New Zealand
62–17
Australia

South Africa
27–22
England
2011  Italy
New Zealand
33–22
England

Australia
30–17
France
2012  South Africa
South Africa
22–16
New Zealand

Wales
25–17
Argentina
2013  France
England
23–15
Wales

South Africa
41–34
New Zealand
2014  New Zealand
England
21–20
South Africa

New Zealand
45–23
Ireland
2015  Italy

Team records

Team Titles Runners-up Third-place Fourth-place
 New Zealand 4 (2008, 2009, 2010, 2011) 1 (2012) 1 (2014) 1 (2013)
 England 2 (2013, 2014) 3 (2008, 2009, 2011) 1 (2010)
 South Africa 1 (2012) 1 (2014) 4 (2008, 2009, 2010, 2013)
 Australia 1 (2010) 1 (2011) 1 (2009)
 Wales 1 (2013) 1 (2012) 1 (2008)
 Argentina 1 (2012)
 France 1 (2011)
 Ireland 1 (2014)

Participating nations

Team
2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014
Years
 Argentina 8th 11th 6th 9th 4th 6th 9th 7
 Australia 5th 4th 2nd 3rd 8th 7th 5th 7
 Canada 12th 14th 2
 England 2nd 2nd 4th 2nd 7th 1st 1st 7
 Fiji 14th 12th 8th 6th 11th 11th 12th 7
 France 6th 5th 5th 4th 6th 5th 6th 7
 Ireland 9th 8th 9th 8th 5th 8th 4th 7
 Italy 11th 13th 11th 12th 11th 5
 Japan 15th 15th 2
 New Zealand 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 4th 3rd 7
 Samoa 7th 7th 12th 10th 9th 8th 6
 Scotland 10th 9th 10th 10th 9th 10th 10th 7
 South Africa 3rd 3rd 3rd 5th 1st 3rd 2nd 7
 Tonga 13th 10th 11th 12th 4
 United States 16th 12th 2
 Uruguay 16th 1
 Wales 4th 6th 7th 7th 3rd 2nd 7th 7
Total 16 16 12 12 12 12 12
Legend

IRB Junior Player of the Year

Year Name Nation
2008 Luke Braid  New Zealand
2009 Aaron Cruden  New Zealand
2010 Julian Savea  New Zealand
2011 George Ford  England
2012 Jan Serfontein  South Africa
2013 Sam Davies  Wales
2014 Handré Pollard  South Africa

See also

References

  1. ^ UK Sport
  2. ^ International Rugby Board

External links

  • IRB TOSHIBA Junior World Championship–from IRB website
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