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Yardangs on Mars

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Title: Yardangs on Mars  
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Subject: Transit of Venus from Mars, Geology of Mars, Surface features of Mars, Stoney (Martian crater), Airy (Martian crater)
Collection: Geology of Mars, Surface Features of Mars
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Yardangs on Mars

Yardangs are common in some regions on Mars, especially in what's called the "Medusae Fossae Formation." This formation is found in the Amazonis quadrangle and near the equator.[1] They are formed by the action of wind on sand sized particles; hence they often point in the direction that the winds were blowing when they were formed.[2] Because they exhibit very few impact craters they are believed to be relatively young.[3] The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Yardangs are parts of rock that have been sand blasted into long, skinny ridges by bouncing sand particles blowing in the wind.[4][5] Layers are seen in parts of the formation. A resistant caprock on the top of yardangs has been observed in Viking,[6] Mars Global Surveyor,[7] and HiRISE photos.[8] Images from spacecraft show that they have different degrees of hardness probably because of significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation.

See also

References

  1. ^ SAO/NASA ADS Astronomy Abstract Service: Yardangs on Mars
  2. ^ http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Yardangs_on_Mars
  3. ^ http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20020416a
  4. ^ http://www.uahirise.org/ESP_039563_1730
  5. ^ http://www.uahirise.org/ESP_039563_1730
  6. ^ Scott, David H.; Tanaka, Kenneth L. (1982). "Ignimbrites of Amazonis Planitia Region of Mars". Journal of Geophysical Research 87: 1179–1190.  
  7. ^ Malin, MC; Carr, MH; Danielson, GE; Davies, ME; Hartmann, WK; Ingersoll, AP; James, PB; Masursky, H; et al. (March 1998). "Early views of the martian surface from the Mars Orbiter Camera of Mars Global Surveyor". Science 279 (5357): 1681–5.  
  8. ^ Mandt, Kathleen E.; De Silva, Shanaka L.; Zimbelman, James R.; Crown, David A. (2008). "The origin of the Medusae Fossae Formation, Mars: Insights from a synoptic approach". Journal of Geophysical Research 113: 12011.  
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