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Zig-Zag

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Zig-Zag

For other uses, see Zigzag (disambiguation).

A zigzag is a pattern made up of small corners at variable angles, though constant within the zigzag, tracing a path between two parallel lines; it can be described as both jagged and fairly regular.

From the point of view of symmetry, a regular zigzag can be generated from a simple motif like a line segment by repeated application of a glide reflection.

The origin of the word is unclear. Its first printed appearance was in French books in the late 17th century.[1]

Examples of zigzags


Lightning and other electrical hazards are often depicted with a zigzag design, with long downward strokes and short backward ones.

The trace of a triangle wave or a sawtooth wave is a zigzag.

Pinking shears are designed to cut cloth or paper with a zigzag edge, to lessen fraying.

Zigzags are a basic decorative pattern used on pottery, and are often seen in the cuts which separate pieces of ravioli pasta.

In sewing, a zigzag stitch is a machine stitch in a zigzag pattern.

The zigzag arch: voussoir (rippled and plain) and Ablaq are architectural embellishments used in Islamic, Byzantine, Norman and Romanesque architecture.[3][4]

See also

Notes

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