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Zoomorphism

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Title: Zoomorphism  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Animal worship, Figure of speech, Jewish views on sin, Hittite mythology, Arts of Caucasian Albania
Collection: Animal Worship, Animals in Religion, Anthropology of Religion, Art Genres, Symbolism
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Zoomorphism

Zoomorphic.


  • Art that portrays one species of animal like another species of animal
  • Art that creates patterns using animal imagery, or animal style
  • Attributing animal form or other animal characteristics to anything other than an animal; similar to but broader than anthropomorphism
  • The tendency of viewing human behaviour in terms of the behaviour of animals, contrary to anthropomorphism, which views animal or non-animal behaviour in human terms

The word derives from the Greek ζωον (zōon), meaning animal, and μορφη (morphē), meaning shape or form.

Contents

  • Examples 1
    • Zoomorphic representation in religion 1.1
    • Zoomorphic language for things, ideas 1.2
    • Other 1.3
  • References 2

Examples

Zoomorphic representation in religion

Zoomorphic language for things, ideas

  • A literary phrase such as "The roar of the ocean".
  • Sin lurking like a beast waiting to devour Cain in Genesis.[4]

Other

References

  1. ^ Hope B. Werness, The Continuum Encyclopedia of Animal Symbolism in Art, Continuum International Publishing Group, 2004, px. ISBN 0-8264-1525-3
  2. ^ Simson R Najovits, Egypt, Trunk of the Tree: A Modern Survey of an Ancient Land, Algora Publishing, 2004, p279. ISBN 0-87586-201-2
  3. ^ Gerina Dunwich, Wicca A to Z: A Modern Witch's Encyclopedia, Kensington Pub Corp, 1998, p155. ISBN 0-8065-1930-4
  4. ^ Synthesis: bulletin du Comité national de littérature comparée / Comitetul Național pentru Literatură Comparată, Institutul de Istorie și Teorie Literară "G. Călinescu." - 2002 "Sin is personified as (an animal?) which "crouches" at the door of Cain (Gen 4:7 ). As Gerhard von Rad (Genesis, 105) remarks, 'The comparison of sin with a beast of prey lying before the door is strange, as is the purely decorative use "
  5. ^ Howden, Daniel (2010-08-19). "Turn left at the horn: 'Rhino City' revealed - Daniel Howden, ''9 August 2010''. The Independent". Independent.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-03-14. 
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