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The Comedie of Errors

By Shakespeare, William

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Book Id: WPLBN0000701258
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 209.09 KB.
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: The Comedie of Errors  
Author: Shakespeare, William
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Literature, Literature & thought, Literature & drama
Collections: DjVu Editions Classic Literature
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: DjVu Editions Classic Literature

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Shakespeare, W. (n.d.). The Comedie of Errors. Retrieved from http://self.gutenberg.org/


Excerpt
Excerpt: The Comedie of Errors; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter the Duke of Ephesus, with the Merchant of Siracusa, Iaylor, and other attendants. Marchant. Proceed Solinus to procure my fall, And by the doome of death end woes and all. Duke. Merchant of Siracusa, plead no more. I am not partiall to infringe our Lawes; The enmity and discord which of late Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your Duke, To Merchants our well-dealing Countrimen, Who wanting gilders to redeeme their lives, Have seal?d his rigorous statutes with their blouds, Excludes all pitty from our threatning lookes: For since the mortall and intestine jarres Twixt thy seditious Countrimen and us, It hath in solemne Synodes beene decreed, Both by the Siracusians and our selves, To admit no trafficke to our aduerse townes: Nay more, if any borne at Ephesus Be seene at any Siracusian Marts and Fayres: Againe, if any Siracusian borne Come to the Bay of Ephesus, he dies: His goods confiscate to the Dukes dispose, Unlesse a thousand markes be levied To quit the penalty, and to ransome him: Thy substance, valued at the highest rate, Cannot amount unto a hundred Markes, Therefore by Law thou art condemn?d to die. Mer. Yet this my comfort, when your words are done, My woes end likewise with the evening Sonne. Duk. Well Siracusian; say in briefe the cause Why thou departedst from thy native home? And for what cause thou cam?st to Ephesus. Mer. A heavier taske could not have beene impos?d, Then I to speake my griefes unspeakeable: Yet that the world may witnesse that my end Was wrought by nature, not by vile offence ...

Table of Contents
Table of Contents: The Comedie of Errors, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Actus Secundus., 7 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 14 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 22 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 33


 

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